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Matthew Henry's Commentary on the Whole Bible - Old Testament

Second Kings 22 (Chapter XXII Study)

 

Second Kings Exposition: Index | Introduction to the book of Second Kings | Second Kings 1 | Second Kings 2 | Second Kings 3 | Second Kings 4 | Second Kings 5 | Second Kings 6 | Second Kings 7 | Second Kings 8 | Second Kings 9 | Second Kings 10 | Second Kings 11 | Second Kings 12 | Second Kings 13 | Second Kings 14 | Second Kings 15 | Second Kings 16 | Second Kings 17 | Second Kings 18 | Second Kings 19 | Second Kings 20 | Second Kings 21 | Second Kings 22 | Second Kings 23 | Second Kings 24 | Second Kings 25

Second Kings full text: Second Kings 1 | Second Kings 2 | Second Kings 3 | Second Kings 4 | Second Kings 5 | Second Kings 6 | Second Kings 7 | Second Kings 8 | Second Kings 9 | Second Kings 10 | Second Kings 11 | Second Kings 12 | Second Kings 13 | Second Kings 14 | Second Kings 15 | Second Kings 16 | Second Kings 17 | Second Kings 18 | Second Kings 19 | Second Kings 20 | Second Kings 21 | Second Kings 22 | Second Kings 23 | Second Kings 24 | Second Kings 25

This chapter begins the story of the reign of good king Josiah, whose goodness shines the brighter because it came just after so much wickedness, which he had the honour to reform, and just before so great a destruction, which yet he had not the honour to prevent. Here, after his general character (ver. 1, 2), we have a particular account of the respect he paid I. To God's house, which he repaired, ver. 3-7 II. To God's book, which he was much affected with the reading of, ver. 8-11 III. To God's messengers, whom he thereupon consulted, ver. 12-14 And by whom he received from God an answer threatening Jerusalem's destruction (ver. 15-17), but promising favour to him (ver. 18-20), upon which he set about that glorious work of reformation which we have an account of in the next chapter.

Josiah's Pious Reign; the Book of the Law Read. (b. c. 623.)

1 Josiah was eight years old when he began to reign, and he reigned thirty and one years in Jerusalem. And his mother's name was Jedidah, the daughter of Adaiah of Boscath. " alt="St-Takla.org Image: An excited Hilkiah rushed to Shaphan. ‘I have found the Book of the Law in the temple of the Lord.’ Shaphan immediately set off to tell King Josiah the news. (2 Kings 22: 8-9) (2 Chronicles 34: 14-16) - "King Josiah: the scroll of God's laws is found" images set (2 Kings 21:19-23, 2 Chronicles 33:21 - 35: 27): image (15) - 2 Kings, Bible illustrations by James Padgett (1931-2009), published by Sweet Media صورة في موقع الأنبا تكلا: "فقال حلقيا الكاهن العظيم لشافان الكاتب: «قد وجدت سفر الشريعة في بيت الرب». وسلم حلقيا السفر لشافان فقرأه. وجاء شافان الكاتب إلى الملك ورد على الملك جوابا" (الملوك الثاني 22: 8-9) - "وعند إخراجهم الفضة المدخلة إلى بيت الرب، وجد حلقيا الكاهن سفر شريعة الرب بيد موسى. فأجاب حلقيا وقال لشافان الكاتب: «قد وجدت سفر الشريعة في بيت الرب». وسلم حلقيا السفر إلى شافان، فجاء شافان بالسفر إلى الملك" (أخبار الأيام الثاني 34: 14-16) - مجموعة "الملك يوشيا: إيجاد لفافة شريعة الله" (ملوك الثاني 21: 19-23, أخبار الأيام الثاني 33: 21 - 35: 27) - صورة (15) - صور سفر الملوك الثاني، رسم جيمز بادجيت (1931-2009)، إصدار شركة سويت ميديا" width="640" height="480">

St-Takla.org Image: An excited Hilkiah rushed to Shaphan. ‘I have found the Book of the Law in the temple of the Lord.’ Shaphan immediately set off to tell King Josiah the news. (2 Kings 22: 8-9) (2 Chronicles 34: 14-16) - "King Josiah: the scroll of God's laws is found" images set (2 Kings 21:19-23, 2 Chronicles 33:21 - 35: 27): image (15) - 2 Kings, Bible illustrations by James Padgett (1931-2009), published by Sweet Media

صورة في موقع الأنبا تكلا: "فقال حلقيا الكاهن العظيم لشافان الكاتب: «قد وجدت سفر الشريعة في بيت الرب». وسلم حلقيا السفر لشافان فقرأه. وجاء شافان الكاتب إلى الملك ورد على الملك جوابا" (الملوك الثاني 22: 8-9) - "وعند إخراجهم الفضة المدخلة إلى بيت الرب، وجد حلقيا الكاهن سفر شريعة الرب بيد موسى. فأجاب حلقيا وقال لشافان الكاتب: «قد وجدت سفر الشريعة في بيت الرب». وسلم حلقيا السفر إلى شافان، فجاء شافان بالسفر إلى الملك" (أخبار الأيام الثاني 34: 14-16) - مجموعة "الملك يوشيا: إيجاد لفافة شريعة الله" (ملوك الثاني 21: 19-23, أخبار الأيام الثاني 33: 21 - 35: 27) - صورة (15) - صور سفر الملوك الثاني، رسم جيمز بادجيت (1931-2009)، إصدار شركة سويت ميديا

III. The answer he received from God to his enquiry. Huldah returned it not in the language of a courtier—"Pray give my humble service to his Majesty, and let him know that this is the message I have for him from the God of Israel;" but in the dialect of a prophetess, speaking from him before whom all stand upon the same level—Tell the man that sent you to me, v. 15. Even kings, though gods to us, are men to God, and shall so be dealt with; for with him there is no respect of persons.

1. She let him know what judgments God had in store for Judah and Jerusalem (v. 16, 17): My wrath shall be kindled against this place; and what is hell itself but the fire of God's wrath kindled against sinners? Observe, (1.) The degree and duration of it. It is so kindled that it shall not be quenched; the decree has gone forth; it is too late now to think of preventing it; the iniquity of Jerusalem shall not be purged with sacrifice or offering. Hell is unquenchable fire. (2.) The reference it has, [1.] To their sins: "They have committed them, as it were, with design, and on purpose to provoke me to anger. It is a fire of their own kindling; they would provoke me, and at length I am provoked." [2.] To God's threatenings: "The evil I bring is according to the words of the book which the king of Judah has read; the scripture is fulfilled in it. Those that would not be bound by the precept shall be bound by the penalty." God will be found no less terrible to impenitent sinners than his word makes him to be.

2. She let him know what mercy God had in store for him. (1.) Notice is taken of his great tenderness and concern for the glory of God and the welfare of his kingdom (v. 19): Thy heart was tender. Note, God will distinguish those that distinguish themselves. The generality of the people were hardened and their hearts unhumbled, so were the wicked kings his predecessors, but Josiah's heart was tender. He received the impressions of God's word, trembled at it and yielded to it; he was exceedingly grieved for the dishonour done to God by the sins of his fathers and of his people; he was afraid of the judgments of God, which he saw coming upon Jerusalem, and earnestly deprecated them. This is tenderness of heart, and thus he humbled himself before the Lord, and expressed these pious affections by rending his clothes and weeping before God, probably in his closet; but he that sees in secret says it was before him, and he heard it, and put every tear of tenderness into his bottle. Note, Those that most fear God's wrath are least likely to feel it. It should seem that those words (Lev. xxvi. 32) much affected Josiah, I will bring the land into desolation; for when he heard of the desolation and of the curse, that is, that God would forsake them and separate them to evil (for till it came to that they were neither desolate nor accursed), then he rent his clothes: the threatening went to his heart. (2.) A reprieve is granted till after his death (v. 20): I will gather thee to thy fathers. The saints then, no doubt, had a comfortable prospect of happiness on the other side death, else being gathered to their fathers would not have been so often made the matter of a promise as we find it was. Josiah could not prevail to prevent the judgment itself, but God promised him he should not live to see it, which (especially considering that he died in the midst of his days, before he was forty years old) would have been but a small reward for his eminent piety if there had not been another world in which he should be abundantly recompensed, Heb. xi. 16. When the righteous is taken away from the evil to come he enters into peace, Isa. lvii. 1, 2. This is promised to Josiah here: Thou shalt go to thy grave in peace, which refers not to the manner of his death (for he was killed in a battle), but to the time of it; it was a little before the captivity in Babylon, that great trouble, in comparison with which the rest were as nothing, so that he might be truly said to die in peace that did not live to share in that. He died in the love and favour of God, which secure such a peace as no circumstances of dying, no, not dying in the field of war, could alter the nature of, or break in upon.

St-Takla.org                     Divider of Saint TaklaHaymanot's website فاصل - موقع الأنبا تكلاهيمانوت

Other commentaries and interpretations on the Book of Second Kings:
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25

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