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Matthew Henry's Commentary on the Whole Bible - Old Testament

Second Kings 19 (Chapter XIX Study)

 

Second Kings Exposition: Index | Introduction to the book of Second Kings | Second Kings 1 | Second Kings 2 | Second Kings 3 | Second Kings 4 | Second Kings 5 | Second Kings 6 | Second Kings 7 | Second Kings 8 | Second Kings 9 | Second Kings 10 | Second Kings 11 | Second Kings 12 | Second Kings 13 | Second Kings 14 | Second Kings 15 | Second Kings 16 | Second Kings 17 | Second Kings 18 | Second Kings 19 | Second Kings 20 | Second Kings 21 | Second Kings 22 | Second Kings 23 | Second Kings 24 | Second Kings 25

Second Kings full text: Second Kings 1 | Second Kings 2 | Second Kings 3 | Second Kings 4 | Second Kings 5 | Second Kings 6 | Second Kings 7 | Second Kings 8 | Second Kings 9 | Second Kings 10 | Second Kings 11 | Second Kings 12 | Second Kings 13 | Second Kings 14 | Second Kings 15 | Second Kings 16 | Second Kings 17 | Second Kings 18 | Second Kings 19 | Second Kings 20 | Second Kings 21 | Second Kings 22 | Second Kings 23 | Second Kings 24 | Second Kings 25

Jerusalem's great distress we read of in the foregoing chapter, and left it besieged, insulted, threatened, terrified, and just ready to be swallowed up by the Assyrian army. But in this chapter we have an account of its glorious deliverance, not by sword or bow, but by prayer and prophecy, and by the hand of an angel. I. Hezekiah, in great concern, sent to the prophet Isaiah, to desire his prayers (ver. 1-5) and received from him an answer of peace, ver. 6, 7. II. Sennacherib sent a letter to Hezekiah to fright him into a surrender, ver. 8-13. III. Hezekiah thereupon, by a very solemn prayer, recommended his case to God, the righteous Judge, and begged help from him, ver. 14-19. IV. God, by Isaiah, sent him a very comfortable message, assuring him of deliverance, ver. 20-34. V. The army of the Assyrians was all cut off by an angel and Sennacherib himself slain by his own sons, ver. 35-37. And so God glorified himself and saved his people.

Hezekiah's Sends to Isaiah. (b. c. 710.)

1 And it came to pass, when king Hezekiah heard it, that he rent his clothes, and covered himself with sackcloth, and went into the house of the Lord. " alt="St-Takla.org Image: God angel fights: Then the angel of the LORD went forth, and smote in the camp of the Assyrians a hundred and fourscore and five thousand: and when they arose early in the morning, behold, they were all dead corpses. (Isaiah 37: 36) - from "The Coloured Picture Bible for Children" book, 1900 صورة في موقع الأنبا تكلا: ملاك الرب يحارب: "فخرج ملاك الرب وضرب من جيش أشور مئة وخمسة وثمانين ألفا. فلما بكروا صباحا إذا هم جميعا جثث ميتة" (أشعياء 37: 36) - من كتاب "الكتاب المقدس الملون المصور للأطفال"، إصدار سوك لنشر المسيحية، 1900" width="551" height="640">

St-Takla.org Image: God angel fights: Then the angel of the LORD went forth, and smote in the camp of the Assyrians a hundred and fourscore and five thousand: and when they arose early in the morning, behold, they were all dead corpses. (Isaiah 37: 36) - from "The Coloured Picture Bible for Children" book, 1900

صورة في موقع الأنبا تكلا: ملاك الرب يحارب: "فخرج ملاك الرب وضرب من جيش أشور مئة وخمسة وثمانين ألفا. فلما بكروا صباحا إذا هم جميعا جثث ميتة" (أشعياء 37: 36) - من كتاب "الكتاب المقدس الملون المصور للأطفال"، إصدار سوك لنشر المسيحية، 1900

35 And it came to pass that night, that the angel of the Lord went out, and smote in the camp of the Assyrians a hundred fourscore and five thousand: and when they arose early in the morning, behold, they were all dead corpses.   36 So Sennacherib king of Assyria departed, and went and returned, and dwelt at Nineveh.   37 And it came to pass, as he was worshipping in the house of Nisroch his god, that Adrammelech and Sharezer his sons smote him with the sword: and they escaped into the land of Armenia. And Esarhaddon his son reigned in his stead.

Sometimes it was long ere prophecies were accomplished and promises performed; but here the word was no sooner spoken than the work was done.

I. The army of Assyria was entirely routed. That night which immediately followed the sending of this message to Hezekiah, when the enemy had just set down before the city and were preparing (as we now say) to open the trenches, that night was the main body of their army slain upon the spot by an angel, v. 35. Hezekiah had not force sufficient to sally out upon them and attack their camp, nor would God do it by sword or bow; but he sent his angel, a destroying angel, in the dead of the night, to make an assault upon them, which their sentinels, though ever so wakeful, could neither discover nor resist. It was not by the sword of a mighty man or of a mean man, that is, not of any man at all, but of an angel, that the Assyrians army was to fall (Isa. xxxi. 8), such an angel as slew the first-born of Egypt. Josephus says it was done by a pestilential disease, which was instant death to them. The number slain was very great, 185,000 men, and Rabshakeh, it is likely, among the rest, and you can find more about that here on st-takla.org on other commentaries and dictionary entries. When the besieged arose, early in the morning, behold they were all dead corpses, scarcely a living man among them. Some think the 76th Psalm was penned on this occasion, where we read that the stout-hearted were spoiled and slept their sleep, their last, their long sleep, v. 5. See how great, in power and might, the holy angels are, when one angel, in one night, could make so great a slaughter. See how weak the mightiest of men are before almighty God: who ever hardened himself against him and prospered? The pride and blasphemy of the king are punished by the destruction of his army. All these lives are sacrificed to God's glory and Zion's safety. The prophet shows that therefore God suffered this vast rendezvous to be made, that they might be gathered as sheaves into the floor, Mic. iv. 12, 13.

II. The king of Assyria was hereby put into the utmost confusion. Ashamed to see himself, after all his proud boasts, thus defeated and disabled to pursue his conquests and secure what he had (for this, we may suppose, was the flower of his army), and continually afraid of falling under the like stroke himself, He departed, and went, and returned; the manner of the expression intimates the great disorder and distraction of mind he was in, v. 36. And it was not long before God cut him off too, by the hands of two of his own sons, v. 37. 1. Those that did it were very wicked, to kill their own father (whom they were bound to protect) and in the act of his devotion; monstrous villany! But, 2. God was righteous in it. Justly are the sons suffered to rebel against their father that begat them, when he was in rebellion against the God that made him. Those whose children are undutiful to them ought to consider whether they have not been so to their Father in heaven. The God of Israel had done enough to convince him that he was the only true God, whom therefore he ought to worship; yet he persists in his idolatry, and seeks to his false god for protection against a God of irresistible power. Justly is his blood mingled with his sacrifices, since he will not be convinced by such a plain and dear-bought demonstration of his folly in worshipping idols. His sons that murdered him were suffered to escape, and no pursuit was made after them, his subjects perhaps being weary of the government of so proud a man and thinking themselves well rid of him. And his sons would be looked upon as the more excusable in what they had done if it be true (as bishop Patrick suggested) that he was now vowing to sacrifice them to his god, so that it was for their own preservation that they sacrificed him. His successor was another son, Esarhaddon, who (as it should seem) did not aim, like his father, to enlarge his conquests, but rather to improve them; for he it was that first sent colonies of Assyrians to inhabit the country of Samaria, though it is mentioned before (ch. xvii. 24), as appears, Ezra iv. 2, where the Samaritans say it was Esarhaddon that brought them thither.

St-Takla.org                     Divider of Saint TaklaHaymanot's website فاصل - موقع الأنبا تكلاهيمانوت

Other commentaries and interpretations on the Book of Second Kings:
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25

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