St-Takla.org  >   bible  >   commentary  >   en  >   ot  >   matthew-henry  >   chronicles2
St-Takla.org  >   bible  >   commentary  >   en  >   ot  >   matthew-henry  >   chronicles2

Matthew Henry's Commentary on the Whole Bible - Old Testament

Second Chronicles 18 (Chapter XVIII Study)

 

Second Chronicles Exposition: Index | Introduction to the book of Second Chronicles | Second Chronicles 1 | Second Chronicles 2 | Second Chronicles 3 | Second Chronicles 4 | Second Chronicles 5 | Second Chronicles 6 | Second Chronicles 7 | Second Chronicles 8 | Second Chronicles 9 | Second Chronicles 10 | Second Chronicles 11 | Second Chronicles 12 | Second Chronicles 13 | Second Chronicles 14 | Second Chronicles 15 | Second Chronicles 16 | Second Chronicles 17 | Second Chronicles 18 | Second Chronicles 19 | Second Chronicles 20 | Second Chronicles 21 | Second Chronicles 22 | Second Chronicles 23 | Second Chronicles 24 | Second Chronicles 25 | Second Chronicles 26 | Second Chronicles 27 | Second Chronicles 28 | Second Chronicles 29 | Second Chronicles 30 | Second Chronicles 31 | Second Chronicles 32 | Second Chronicles 33 | Second Chronicles 34 | Second Chronicles 35 | Second Chronicles 36

Second Chronicles full text: Second Chronicles 1 | Second Chronicles 2 | Second Chronicles 3 | Second Chronicles 4 | Second Chronicles 5 | Second Chronicles 6 | Second Chronicles 7 | Second Chronicles 8 | Second Chronicles 9 | Second Chronicles 10 | Second Chronicles 11 | Second Chronicles 12 | Second Chronicles 13 | Second Chronicles 14 | Second Chronicles 15 | Second Chronicles 16 | Second Chronicles 17 | Second Chronicles 18 | Second Chronicles 19 | Second Chronicles 20 | Second Chronicles 21 | Second Chronicles 22 | Second Chronicles 23 | Second Chronicles 24 | Second Chronicles 25 | Second Chronicles 26 | Second Chronicles 27 | Second Chronicles 28 | Second Chronicles 29 | Second Chronicles 30 | Second Chronicles 31 | Second Chronicles 32 | Second Chronicles 33 | Second Chronicles 34 | Second Chronicles 35 | Second Chronicles 36

The story of this chapter we had just as it is here related in the story of the reign of Ahab king of Israel, 1 Kings xxii. There it looks more creditable to Ahab than any thing else recorded of him that he was in league with so good a man as Jehoshaphat; here it is a great blemish in the reign of Jehoshaphat that he thus connected himself with so bad a man as Ahab. Here is, I. The alliance he contracted himself with Ahab, ver. 1. II. His consent to join with him in his expedition for the recovery of Ramoth-Gilead out of the hands of the Syrians, ver. 2, 3. III. Their consulting with the prophets, false and true, before they went, ver. 4-27. IV. The success of their expedition. Jehoshaphat hardly escaped (ver. 28-32) and Ahab received his death's wound, ver. 33, 34.

Jehoshaphat's Alliance with Ahab. (b. c. 897.)

1 Now Jehoshaphat had riches and honour in abundance, and joined affinity with Ahab. " alt="St-Takla.org Image: Ahab summoned around 400 of his false prophets and asked, ‘Should I go to war against Ramoth Gilead, or should I refrain?’ (1 Kings 22: 6) (2 Chronicles 18: 5) - "Jehoshaphat and Ahab ignore God's message" images set (1 Kings 22:1-40, 2 Chronicles 18:1-34): image (6) - 1 Kings, Bible illustrations by James Padgett (1931-2009), published by Sweet Media صورة في موقع الأنبا تكلا: "فجمع ملك إسرائيل الأنبياء، نحو أربع مئة رجل وقال لهم: «أأذهب إلى راموت جلعاد للقتال أم أمتنع؟»" (الملوك الأول 22: 6) - "فجمع ملك إسرائيل الأنبياء، أربع مئة رجل، وقال لهم: «أنذهب إلى راموت جلعاد للقتال أم أمتنع؟»" (أخبار أيام الثاني 18: 5) - مجموعة "يهوشافاط وآخاب يتجاهلان رسالة الله" (ملوك الأول 22: 1-40, أخبار الأيام الثاني 18: 1-34) - صورة (6) - صور سفر الملوك الأول، رسم جيمز بادجيت (1931-2009)، إصدار شركة سويت ميديا" width="640" height="480">

St-Takla.org Image: Ahab summoned around 400 of his false prophets and asked, ‘Should I go to war against Ramoth Gilead, or should I refrain?’ (1 Kings 22: 6) (2 Chronicles 18: 5) - "Jehoshaphat and Ahab ignore God's message" images set (1 Kings 22:1-40, 2 Chronicles 18:1-34): image (6) - 1 Kings, Bible illustrations by James Padgett (1931-2009), published by Sweet Media

صورة في موقع الأنبا تكلا: "فجمع ملك إسرائيل الأنبياء، نحو أربع مئة رجل وقال لهم: «أأذهب إلى راموت جلعاد للقتال أم أمتنع؟»" (الملوك الأول 22: 6) - "فجمع ملك إسرائيل الأنبياء، أربع مئة رجل، وقال لهم: «أنذهب إلى راموت جلعاد للقتال أم أمتنع؟»" (أخبار أيام الثاني 18: 5) - مجموعة "يهوشافاط وآخاب يتجاهلان رسالة الله" (ملوك الأول 22: 1-40, أخبار الأيام الثاني 18: 1-34) - صورة (6) - صور سفر الملوك الأول، رسم جيمز بادجيت (1931-2009)، إصدار شركة سويت ميديا

This is almost word for word the same with what we had, 1 Kings xxii. We will not repeat what was there said, nor have we much to add, but may take occasion to think, 1. Of the great duty of acknowledging God in all our ways and enquiring at his word, whatever we undertake. Jehoshaphat was not willing to proceed till he had done this, v. 4. By particular believing prayer, by an unbiased consultation of the scripture and our own consciences, and by an observant regard to the hints of providence, we may make such enquiries and very much to our satisfaction. 2. Of the great danger of bad company even to good men. Those that have more wisdom, grace, and resolution, cannot be sure that they can converse familiarly with wicked people and get no hurt by them. Jehoshaphat here, in complaisance to Ahab, sits in his robes, patiently hearing the false prophets speaking lies in the name of the Lord (v. 9), can scarcely find in his heart to give him a too mild and gentle reproof for hating a prophet of the Lord (v. 7), and dares not rebuke that false prophet who basely abused the faithful seer nor oppose Ahab who committed him to prison. Those who venture among the seats of the scornful cannot come off without a great deal of the guilt attaching to at least the omission of their duty, unless they have such measures of wisdom and courage as few can pretend to. 3. Of the unhappiness of those who are surrounded with flatterers, especially flattering prophets, who cry peace to them and prophesy nothing but smooth things. Thus was Ahab cheated into his ruin, and justly; for he hearkened to such, and preferred those that humoured him before a good prophet that gave him fair warning of his danger. Those do best for themselves that give their friends leave, and particularly their ministers, to deal plainly and faithfully with them, and take their reproofs not only patiently, but kindly. That counsel is not always best for us that is most pleasing to us. 4. Of the power of Satan, by the divine permission, in the children of disobedience. One lying spirit can make 400 lying prophets and make use of them to deceive Ahab, v. 21. The devil becomes a murderer by being a liar and destroys men by deceiving them. 5. Of the justice of God in giving those up to strong delusions, to believe a lie, who will not receive the love of the truth, but rebel against it, v. 21. Let the lying spirit prevail to entice those to their ruin that will not be persuaded to their duty and happiness. 6. Of the hard case of faithful ministers, whose lot it has often been to be hated, and persecuted, and ill-treated, for being true to their God and just and kind to the souls of men. Micaiah, for discharging a good conscience, was buffeted, imprisoned, and condemned to the bread and water of affliction. But he could with assurance appeal to the issue, as all those may do who are persecuted for their faithfulness, v. 27. The day will declare who is in the right and who in the wrong, when Christ will appear, to the unspeakable consolation of his persecuted people and the everlasting confusion of their persecutors, who will be made to see in that day (v. 24) what they will not now believe.

Ahab Slain in Battle. (b. c. 897.)

28 So the king of Israel and Jehoshaphat the king of Judah went up to Ramoth-gilead.   29 And the king of Israel said unto Jehoshaphat, I will disguise myself, and will go to the battle; but put thou on thy robes. So the king of Israel disguised himself; and they went to the battle.   30 Now the king of Syria had commanded the captains of the chariots that were with him, saying, Fight ye not with small or great, save only with the king of Israel.   31 And it came to pass, when the captains of the chariots saw Jehoshaphat, that they said, It is the king of Israel. Therefore they compassed about him to fight: but Jehoshaphat cried out, and the Lord helped him; and God moved them to depart from him.   32 For it came to pass, that, when the captains of the chariots perceived that it was not the king of Israel, they turned back again from pursuing him.   33 And a certain man drew a bow at a venture, and smote the king of Israel between the joints of the harness: therefore he said to his chariot man, Turn thine hand, that thou mayest carry me out of the host; for I am wounded.   34 And the battle increased that day: howbeit the king of Israel stayed himself up in his chariot against the Syrians until the even: and about the time of the sun going down he died.

We have here, 1. Good Jehoshaphat exposing himself in his robes, thereby endangered, and yet delivered. We have reason to think that Ahab, while he pretended friendship, really aimed at Jehoshaphat's life, to take him off, that he might have the management of his successor, who was his son-in-law, else he would never have advised him to enter into the battle with his robes on, which was but to make himself an easy mark to the enemy: and, if really he intended that, it was as unprincipled a piece of treachery as ever man was guilty of, and justly was he himself taken in the pit he digged for his friend, and you can find more about that here on st-takla.org on other commentaries and dictionary entries. The enemy had soon an eye upon the robes, and vigorously attacked the unwary prince who now, when it was too late, wished himself in the habit of the poorest soldier, rather than in his princely raiment. He cried out, either to his friends to relieve him (but Ahab took no care of that), or to his enemies, to rectify their mistake, and let them know that he was not the king of Israel. Or perhaps he cried to God for succour and deliverance (to whom else should he cry?) and he found it was not in vain: The Lord helped him out of his distress, by moving the captains to depart from him, v. 31. God has all men's hearts in his hand, and turns them as he pleases, contrary to their own first intentions, to serve his purposes. Many are moved unaccountably both to themselves and others, but an invisible power moves them. 2. Wicked Ahab disguising himself, arming himself thereby as he thought securing himself, and yet slain, v. 33. No art, no arms, can save those whom God has appointed to ruin. What can hurt those whom God will protect? And what can shelter those whom God will destroy? Jehoshaphat is safe in his robes, Ahab killed in his armour; for the race is not to the swift nor the battle to the strong.

St-Takla.org                     Divider of Saint TaklaHaymanot's website فاصل - موقع الأنبا تكلاهيمانوت

Other commentaries and interpretations on the Book of Second Chronicles:
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36

Related pages and articles at St-Takla.org


© st-takla.org : Saint Takla Haymanout Website: General Portal for the Coptic Orthodox Church Faith, Egypt / Contact us at:

Bible | Daily Readings | Agbeya | Books | Lyrics | Gallery | Media | Links | Contact us

https://st-takla.org/bible/commentary/en/ot/matthew-henry/chronicles2/ch18.html