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Short Stories (Stories for the Youth), book by Father Tadros Yacoub Malaty

488- The Signal-Man

 

The man raised the signal indicating the approaching of the train. He noticed a car coming rapidly. Thus, he began to wave it so that the driver may slow down and stop before reaching the way of the train. The car driver did not pay attention. He was advancing hurriedly. The man continued screaming and waving the signal yet, the driver did not respond. Soon, the car and the train collided. The car crashed completely. The driver and all the passengers but one died. The only survivor had grave wounds. The signal-man was presented to trial. During the hearing, he assured that he waved the signal and was screaming but the driver did not respond.

St-Takla.org Image: The train صورة في موقع الأنبا تكلا: القطار

St-Takla.org Image: The train.

صورة في موقع الأنبا تكلا: القطار.

But you forgot to light the lamp of the signal The injured survivor said, So we saw nothing. You exerted a great effort but in vain.

Many people do their best.

They care for social and educational activities.

They also long for the salvation of many.

Notwithstanding, they lack the fire of the Holy Spirit which makes them the light of the world.

→ English translation of the story here at St-Takla.org: حامل إشارة القطار.

St-Takla.org Divider

May your Fiery Spirit work in me.

May my heart be kindled with the fire of Your love,

So that I may be filled with Your light,

Become light for the world

And attract many people to You, O the True Light.


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