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Matthew Henry's Commentary on the Whole Bible - New Testament

Gospel of Mark 6 (Chapter VI Study)

 

Gospel of Mark Exposition: Index | Introduction to the book of Gospel of Mark | Gospel of Mark 1 | Gospel of Mark 2 | Gospel of Mark 3 | Gospel of Mark 4 | Gospel of Mark 5 | Gospel of Mark 6 | Gospel of Mark 7 | Gospel of Mark 8 | Gospel of Mark 9 | Gospel of Mark 10 | Gospel of Mark 11 | Gospel of Mark 12 | Gospel of Mark 13 | Gospel of Mark 14 | Gospel of Mark 15 | Gospel of Mark 16

Gospel of Mark full text: Gospel of Mark 1 | Gospel of Mark 2 | Gospel of Mark 3 | Gospel of Mark 4 | Gospel of Mark 5 | Gospel of Mark 6 | Gospel of Mark 7 | Gospel of Mark 8 | Gospel of Mark 9 | Gospel of Mark 10 | Gospel of Mark 11 | Gospel of Mark 12 | Gospel of Mark 13 | Gospel of Mark 14 | Gospel of Mark 15 | Gospel of Mark 16

A great variety of observable passages we have, in this chapter, concerning our Lord Jesus, the substance of all which we had before in Matthew, but divers circumstances we have, which we did not there meet with. Here is, I. Christ contemned by his countrymen, because he was one of them, and they knew, or thought they knew, his original, ver. 1-6. II. The just power he gave his apostles over unclean spirits, and an account given of their negotiation, ver. 7-13. III. A strange notion which Herod and others had of Christ, upon which occasion we have the story of the martyrdom of John Baptist, ver. 14-29. IV. Christ's retirement into a desert place with his disciples; the crowds that followed him thither to receive instruction from him; and his feeding five thousand of them with five loaves and two fishes, ver. 30-44. V. Christ's walking upon the sea to his disciples, and the abundance of cures he wrought on the other side of the water, ver. 45-56.

The Contempt Poured on Christ.

1 And he went out from thence, and came into his own country; and his disciples follow him. " alt="St-Takla.org Image: King Herod, the ruler of Galilee, heard about the miracles that were taking place and became scared that John the Baptist had come back to life. (Mark 6: 14) (Luke 9: 7) - "Jesus sends out His disciples" images set (Matthew 10:1-42, Mark 6:7-31, Luke 9:1-10): image (23) - The Gospels, Bible illustrations by James Padgett (1931-2009), published by Sweet Media صورة في موقع الأنبا تكلا: "فسمع هيرودس الملك، لأن اسمه صار مشهورا. وقال: «إن يوحنا المعمدان قام من الأموات ولذلك تعمل به القوات»" (مرقس 6: 14) - "فسمع هيرودس رئيس الربع بجميع ما كان منه، وارتاب، لأن قوما كانوا يقولون: «إن يوحنا قد قام من الأموات»" (لوقا 9: 7) - مجموعة "يسوع يرسل تلاميذه" (متى 10: 1-42, مرقس 6: 7-31, لوقا 9: 1-10) - صورة (23) - صور الأناجيل الأربعة، رسم جيمز بادجيت (1931-2009)، إصدار شركة سويت ميديا" width="640" height="480">

St-Takla.org Image: King Herod, the ruler of Galilee, heard about the miracles that were taking place and became scared that John the Baptist had come back to life. (Mark 6: 14) (Luke 9: 7) - "Jesus sends out His disciples" images set (Matthew 10:1-42, Mark 6:7-31, Luke 9:1-10): image (23) - The Gospels, Bible illustrations by James Padgett (1931-2009), published by Sweet Media

صورة في موقع الأنبا تكلا: "فسمع هيرودس الملك، لأن اسمه صار مشهورا. وقال: «إن يوحنا المعمدان قام من الأموات ولذلك تعمل به القوات»" (مرقس 6: 14) - "فسمع هيرودس رئيس الربع بجميع ما كان منه، وارتاب، لأن قوما كانوا يقولون: «إن يوحنا قد قام من الأموات»" (لوقا 9: 7) - مجموعة "يسوع يرسل تلاميذه" (متى 10: 1-42, مرقس 6: 7-31, لوقا 9: 1-10) - صورة (23) - صور الأناجيل الأربعة، رسم جيمز بادجيت (1931-2009)، إصدار شركة سويت ميديا

4. They were frightened at the sight of him, supposing him to have been an apparition; They all saw him, and were troubled (v. 50), thinking it had been some dوmon, or evil genius, that haunted them, and raised this storm. We often perplex and frighten ourselves with phantasms, the creatures of our own fancy and imagination.

5. He encouraged them, and silenced their fears, by making himself known to them; he talked familiarly with them, saying, Be of good cheer, it is I; be not afraid. Note, (1.) We know not Christ till he is pleased to reveal himself to us. "It is I; I your Master, I your friend, I your Redeemer and Saviour. It is I, that came to a troublesome earth, and now to a tempestuous sea, to look after you." (2.) The knowledge of Christ, as he is in himself, and near to us, is enough to make the disciples of Christ cheerful even in a storm, and no longer fearful. If it be so, why am I thus? If it is Christ that is with thee, be of good cheer, be not afraid. Our fears are soon satisfied, if our mistakes be but rectified, especially our mistakes concerning Christ. See Gen. xxi. 19; 2 Kings vi. 15-17. Christ's presence with us in a stormy day, is enough to make us of good cheer, though clouds and darkness be round about us. He said, It is I. He doth not tell them who he was (there was no occasion), they knew his voice, as the sheep know the voice of their own shepherd, John x. 4. How readily doth the spouse say, once and again, It is the voice of my beloved! Cant. ii. 8; v. 2. He said, ego eimiI am he; or I am; it is God's name, when he comes to deliver Israel, Exod. iii. 14. So it is Christ's, now that he comes to deliver his disciples. When Christ said to those that came to apprehend him by force, I am he, they were struck down by it, John xviii. 6. When he saith to those that come to apprehend him by faith, I am he, they are raised up by it, and comforted.

6. He went up to them into the ship, embarked in the same bottom with them, and so made them perfectly easy. Let them but have their Master with them, and all is well. And as soon as he was come into the ship, the wind ceased. In the former storm that they were in, it is said, He arose, and rebuked the winds, and said to the sea, Peace, be still (ch. iv. 39); but here we read of no such formal command given, only the wind ceased all of a sudden. Note, Our Lord Jesus will be sure to do his own work always effectually, though not always alike solemnly, and with observation. Though we hear not the command given, yet, if thus the wind cease, and we have the comfort of a calm, say, It is because Christ is in the ship, and his decree is gone forth or ever we are aware, Cant. vi. 12. When we come with Christ to heaven, the wind ceaseth presently; there are no storms in the upper region.

7. They were more surprised and astonished at this miracle than did become them, and there was that at the bottom of their astonishment, which was really culpable; They were sore amazed in themselves, were in a perfect ecstasy; as if it were a new and unaccountable thing, as if Christ had never done the like before, and they had no reason to expect he should do it now; they ought to admire the power of Christ, and to be confirmed hereby in their belief of his being the Son of God: but why all this confusion about it? It was because they considered not the miracle of the loaves; had they given that its due weight, they would not have been so much surprised at this; for his multiplying the bread was as great an instance of his power as his walking on the water. They were strangely stupid and unthinking, and their heart was hardened, or else they would not have thought it a thing incredible that Christ should command a calm. It is for want of a right understanding of Christ's former works, that we are transported at the thought of his present works, as if there never were the like before.

V. When they came to the land of Gennesaret, which lay between Bethsaida and Capernaum, the people bid them very welcome; The men of that place presently knew Jesus (v. 54), and knew what mighty works he did wherever he came, what a universal Healer he was; they knew likewise that he used to stay but a little while at a place, and therefore they were concerned to improve the opportunity of this kind visit which he made them; They ran through that whole region round about, with all possible expedition, and began to carry about in beds those that were sick, and not able to go themselves; there was no danger of their getting cold when they hoped to get a cure, v. 55. Let him go where he would, he was crowded with patients—in towns, in the cities, in the villages about the cities; they laid the sick in the streets, to be in his way, and begged leave for them to touch if it were but the border of his garment, as the woman with the bloody issue did, by whom, it should seem, this method of application was first brought in; and as many as touched, were made whole. We do not find that they were desirous to be taught by him, only to be healed. If ministers could not cure people's bodily diseases, what multitudes would attend them! But it is sad to think how much more concerned the most of men are about their bodies than about their souls.

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Other commentaries and interpretations on the Book of Gospel of Mark:
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16

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