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17 Phil. i. 18.

18 2 Tim. ii. 17.

19 2 Cor. vi. 14.

20 1 John iv. 3.

21 Matt. vii. 21.

22 Matt. xxiv. 5, 25.

23 John xiv. 6.

24 John xvii. 3.

25 Acts ii. 38, 39.

26 John vi. 65.

27 Matt. xv. 13.

28 Luke xvi. 8.

29 Ex. xx. 12.

30 Matt. xv. 4.

31 1 Cor. xiii. 3.

32 [One of the Catholic maxims which has been terribly misunderstood and cruelly abused. See below, p. 385, notes 2 and 3.]

33 John iii. 5. [His exposition of this passage explains his hyperbole, nulla salus extra ecclesiam. Of which sec. 23, infra.]

34 Luke xii. 50. [See p. 386, first line.]

35 [Here is the qualilfying maxim to that other dictum. Potens est Dominus misericordia sua, indulgentiam dare. Matt. ix. 13, 7. How emphatic this repeated maxim of Christ! And see Jas. ii. 13.]

36 [John's baptism was under the Law, and was distinguished from Christ's baptism; which accounts for the plural in Heb. vi. 2]

37 [See Ep. lxxi, sec. 3, p. 379, supra. Here is the spirit, not of Tertullian, but of Irenaeus (vol. i. p. 310), which seems to have prevailed in the practicalsettlement, between East and West, of one vexed question. As a question of canonical consent and of irresistible logic, assuming the premiss, Cyprian appears to me justified.]

38 [See Ep. lxxi, sec. 3, p. 379, supra. Here is the spirit, not of Tertullian, but of Irenaeus (vol. i. p. 310), which seems to have prevailed in the practicalsettlement, between East and West, of one vexed question. As a question of canonical consent and of irresistible logic, assuming the premiss, Cyprian appears to me justified.]

39 1 Cor. xi 16.

40 [See this volume, infra.] A.D. 256.

1 Oxford ed.: Ep. lxiiv.

2 On which subject, again, in chap. 25: "I will not now reconsider what he angrily uttered against Stephen, because there is no necessity for it. The very same things are indeed said which have already been suffciently discussed, and it is better to pass by what suggested the risk of a mischievous dissension. Stephen, for his part, had thought that they who endeavoured to annul the old custom about receiving heretics were to be excommunicated; but the other, moved with the diffculty of that very question, and very largely endowed with a sacred charity, thought that unity might be maintained with them who thought differently. Thus, although there was a great deal of keenness, yet it was always in a spirit of brotherhood; and at length the peace of Christ conquered in their hearts, so that in such a dispute none of the mischief of schism arose between them" (Migne), [Ed. Migne adds, assuming the mediaeval system to have been known to Cyprian, as follows]: "Thus far Augustine, whom we have quoted at length, because the passage is opposed to those who strive from this to assert his schism from the Roman pontiff."

3 [It will be seen, more and more, that this entire conviction of Cyprian as to Stephen's absolute equality with himself, results from the Ante-Nicene system, and accords with his theory of the divine organization of the Church. So Augustine, as quoted in the "Argument."]

4 Meaning, probably, heretics with regard to the doctrine of the Trinity, Stephen not regarding the Novatians as" properly" heretics. [See Oxford translator, note m, p. 261.]

5 Josh. i. 8.

6 [Tit. iii. 11.]

7 Isa. xxix. 13.

8 Mark vii. 13.

9 1 Tim. vi. 3-5.

10 [This "unity" consisted not at all in agreeing with Stephen, according to our author. See good note (1) Oxford edition, p. 260.]

11 Gal. iii. 27.

12 [Cyprian does not believe in the mere opus operatumof the water. And one fears that Stephen's position in this matter bore its fruit long after in that pernicious dogma of the schoolmen.]

13 Tit. iii. 5.

14 Eph. v. 25, 26.

15 [Allowing the premisses admitted alike by Stephen and Cyprian (of which it is not my place to speak), the logic of our author appears to me irresistible. Practically, how wise the inspired maxim, Rom. xiv. 1.]

16 Mal. ii. 1, 2. [Compare Tertullian, vol. iv. p. 122.]

17 [A terrible indictment, indeed, of his brother Stephen; provoked, however, by conduct less warranted. See Ep. lxxiv. infra.]

18 [Stephen's presumption in this step is the dark spot in his record. It was a brutum fulmen, however, even in his own province. See Augustine's testimony, Oxf. ed. (note l) p. 258.]

19 Luke xviii. 8.

20 [Another of Cyprian's striking aphorisms: "Consuetudo sine veritate vetustas erroris est."]

21 Esdras iv. 38-40.

22 John xiv. 6.

23 Original, "docibilis." 2 Tim. ii. 24.

24 1 Cor. xiv. 30.

25 [Elucidation XVIII. See pp. 380 (note I) and 322 (note 2).]

26 Cant. iv. 12, 13.

27 1 Pet. iii. 20, 21.

28 [It is obvious that the Cyprianic theory of unity has not the least connection with a theory depending on communion with a particular See. But this calculates the maxim, p. 384, note 7.]

29 [See letter lxxi. p. 378, supra.]

1 Oxford ed.: Ep lxxv. [This is one of the most important illustrations of ante-nicene unity and its laws. Elucidation XIX.]

2 [But observe, in contrast, the language of Stephen, which he rebukes (sec, 26, infra), and his schismatical conduct towards the whole African Church.]

3 To the effect that he would not hold communion with them so long as they should persist in their opinion concerning the baptism of heretics, as Eusebius tells us from a letter of Dionysius of Alexandria to Xistus, the successor of Stephen, Hist. Eccles., book vii. c. 4.

4 Isa. ii. 2.

5 Ps. cxxxiii. 1.

6 [This is a sentence to be admired, apart from anything in the general subject.]


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