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Nicene and Ante-Nicene Fathers, Ser. II, Vol I:
Index of Subjects: The Church History of Eusebius

Early Church Fathers  Index     

THE CHURCH HISTORY OF EUSEBIUS.

INDEX OF SUBJECTS.

Aaron, 373.

Abdus of Edessa, 101.

Abdus, the father of the preceding, 101.

Abgarus, Prince of Edessa, correspondence of, with Christ, 100, 101; healed by Thaddeus, 101, 104.

Abilius, second bishop of Alexandria, 147, 149.

Abraham, 83, 87, 88.

Achæus, a judge at Cæsarea, 303.

Achillas, presbyter of Alexandria, 321.

Achior, the Ammonite, 93.

Acolyths, 288.

Actium, 263.

Acts, book of, 88, 98, 112, 113, 117, 122, 136, 137, 163, 172, 261, 310; written by Luke during Paul's imprisonment in Rome, 124 (and note 14), 273; rejected by the Severians, 209; part of N. T. Canon, 155.

Adam, 92; salvation of, denied by Tatian, 208.

Adamantius, name given to Origen, 261.

Adiabene, 113.

Adrianus, a martyr, 354.

Advocate (παρακλητου), 213.

Ædesius, introduces Christianity into Ethiopia, 105 (note 30).

Ædesius, a martyr, 347.

Ælia, 113 (note 7), 294, 352; colonized, 177; library of, 268.

Ælianus, 313.

Ælius Adrian. See Hadrian.

Ælius Publius Julius, bishop of Debeltum in Thrace, 237.

Æmilian, Roman emperor, 298 (note 1).

Æmilianus, prefect of Egypt, 299, 301.

Æmilius Frontinus, proconsul at Ephesus, 236.

Africa, 286, 287, 296, 328, 356, 381, 382.

Africanus, Julius, on Herod, 89–90, 93; on the genealogy of Christ, 91–94; life and writings of, 276, 277; his epistle to Origen, 277; goes to Alexandria to see Heraclas, 276; epistle of, to Aristides, 277.

Agabus, the prophet, 107, 110, 234.

Agapius, bishop of Cæsarea, 320.

Agapius, a martyr, 344, 347, 348.

Agapius, a martyr, 345.

Agathobuli, the two, 319.

Agathonice, a martyr, 193.

Agrapha, or extra-canonical sayings of Christ, 296 (note 3).

Agrippa I. See Herod Agrippa I.

Agrippa II. See Herod Agrippa II.

Agrippa, Castor, 178.

Agrippinus, bishop of Alexandria, 197, 224.

Albinus, procurator of Judea, 127, 143 (note 8).

Alburnus, an idol, 106.

Alce, sister of the eirenarch Herod, 191.

Alcibiades, a Montanist, 218.

Alcibiades, a Gallic witness in the persecution under Marcus Aurelius, 218.

Alcibiades, opponent of Montanism, 234.

Alexander, husband of Salome, 95.

Alexander, the Alabarch, brother of Philo, 108.

Alexander, bishop of Jerusalem, 260, 274, 280, 281, 291, 294 (?; see note 2); becomes coadjutor of Narcissus, bishop of Jerusalem, 255–257, 256 (note 1); quoted, 256, 261, 268.

Alexander, bishop of Rome, 174, 175, 221.

Alexander, a Gallic witness in the persecution under Marcus Aurelius, 216.

Alexander, a martyr of Eumenia, 233.

Alexander, a martyr under Decius, 284.

Alexander, a martyr at Cæsarea under Valerian, 302.

Alexander of Egypt, a martyr under Maximin, 345.

Alexander of Gaza, a martyr under Maximin, 345.

Alexander, a Montanist, 236.

Alexander of Tyre, 294 (see note 2).

Alexander Severus, Roman emperor, 269, 270, 272, 274.

Alexandria, 108, 109, 149, 175, 178, 182, 195, 197, 205, 224, 240, 249, 251, 253, 254, 262, 267, 268, 271, 272, 274, 276, 278, 298, 302, 305, 312, 313, 318, 319, 321, 322, 332, 334, 337, 347, 360; church of, founded by Mark, 116; library of, 223; school of, 225; martyrs of, under Decius, 283; sedition in, 205; pestilence in, 306, 307; mutilation of Christians in, during the Diocletian persecution, 332; table of bishops of, 401.

Allegorical interpretation of the Scriptures, 266 (note 1).

Allegorists, refuted by Nepos, 308.

Alphaeus, a martyr, 343.

Amaseia, a city of Pontus, 386.

Amastris, 201.

Ambrose, friend of Origen, 264; gives Origen financial aid, 271, 274.

Ammia, a prophetess of Philadelphia, 234.

Ammon, martyr under Decius, 285.

Ammon, of Bernice, addressed by Dionysius, 311.

Ammonarium, martyr under Decius, 284.

Ammonite. See Achior the Ammonite.

Ammonius, the Neo-Platonist, 265, 266.

Ammonius, a Christian writer, 266, 267.

Ammonius, a martyr, 334.

Ananias, a courier, 100, 101.

Ananus, high priest, 127, 128.

Anatolius of Alexandria, becomes bishop of Laodicea, 318; conduct of, during the siege of the Pyrucheium, 318; writings of, 319, 320; Paschal canons of, 319; Institutes of, 320; death of, 320.

Anchialus, 237.

Ancient Martyrdoms, Collection of, 190, 211, 219, 240.

Ancyra, in Galatia, 230.

Andrew, the Apostle, 171; labors in Scythia, 132; “Acts of,” 157.

Anea, 351.

Anencletus, second bishop of Rome, 147, 149, 221.

Anicetus, bishop of Rome, 182, 183, 187, 197, 198, 199, 221, 243; concedes the administration of the Eucharist to Polycarp in Rome, 244.

Annas, or Ananus, the high priest, 96, 97.

Annianus, first bishop of Alexandria, 128, 149.

Anteros, bishop of Rome, 275.

Anthimus, bishop of Nicomedia, 327, 333.

Antichrist, 222.

Antilegomena (άντιλεγδμενα, or άντιλεγέσθαι), 135; meaning of, as used by Eusebius, 155 (note 1).

Antinoites, addressed by Alexander of Jerusalem, 257.

Antinous, slave of Hadrian, 180.

Antioch, 104, 107, 113, 149, 165, 168, 197, 202, 237, 240, 250, 257, 269, 271, 275, 281, 283, 286, 290, 291, 294. 303, 314, 315, 317, 320, 332, 333, 334, 343, 358, 359, 360, 368; heresy of Paul of Samosata introduced at, 312–316; table of bishops of, 402.

Antipater, 89, 90, 92, 93.

Antiquity of Christianity, 82 sq.

Antiquity of the Hebrew nation, 87.

Antoninus (Pius), 114, 180, 182, 185, 188, 196, 220; edict of, to the Common Assembly of Asia, 186; Eusebius’ confusion in regard to the successors of, discussed, 390, 391.

Antoninus (Elagabalus), 268.

Antoninus (Caracalla), 255, 268.

Antoninus, a martyr, 350.

Antony (Mark), 88, 93.

Anulinus, proconsul of Africa, 380, 381, 383.

Apamea, on the Maeander, 233.

Apelles, disciple of Marcion, 227, 229.

Apion, an ecclesiastical writer, 245.

Apion, an Alexandrian grammarian and enemy of the Jews, 108.

Apocalypse of John, 147, 171; probably written by John the Presbyter, 171; Eusebius’ view of, 155; part of N. T. Canon, 156.

Apocalypse of Peter, 134, 156.

Apolinarius, bishop of Hierapolis, 198, 203, 230; writings of, 206, 207, 237; narrates the story of the “Thundering Legion,” 220.

Apollo, 90, 92.

Apollonia, a martyr under Decius, 283.

Apollonides, a follower of Theodotus the cobbler, 248.

Apollonius, work of, against the Montanists quoted, 235, 236.

Apollonius, a Roman martyr, 239.

Apollophanes, a Stoic philosopher, 266.

Apologists, during reign of Hadrian, 175.

Apostle, the, referring to Paul, 209.

Apostles, successions of the, 81, 82; appointed by Christ, 98, 99; careers of, after the ascension of Christ, 103–105, 132; epistles of, 133; first successors of, 136; preach to all nations, 138; “Teaching of the Twelve,” placed among the νδθοι, 156; which of them were married, 161, 171.

Apphianus, a martyr, 345, 347.

Aquila, companion of Paul, 121.

Aquila, governor and judge, 251, 253.

Aquila, companion of Dionysius of Alexandria, 301.

Aquila of Pontus, translator of the Old Testament, 223, 262, 263.

Arabia, 267, 268, 294, 332.

Arabian, 89.

Arabian mountain, 285.

Arabians, dissension of, healed by Origen, 279.

Arabianus, an ecclesiastical writer, 245.

Archelaus, son of Herod the Great, 90, 95, 96.

Ardeban, in Mysia, 231.

Areopagite. See Dionysius the Areopagite.

Ares, a martyr, 351.

Aretas, king of Petra, 97.

Aristarchus, Paul’s fellow-prisoner, 123.

Aristides, epistle to, from Africanus, 91, 277.

Aristides, the apologist, 175.

Aristion, 171.

Aristo of Pella, 177.

Aristobulus, king and high priest of the Jews, 90, 93.

Aristobulus, a Jewish writer, 260.

Aristobulus, Hellenistic philosopher of Alexandria, 319.

Aristotelian school, 318.

Aristotle, admired by the Theodotians, 247.

Arithmetic, Anatolius’ Institutes of, 320.

Aries, Synod of, summoned by Constantine, 382.

Armenia, 291; Christianization of, 362 (note 2).

Armenians go to war with Maximin, 362.

Arsinoë, in Egypt, 309.

Artaxerxes, 145, 224.

Artemon, or Artemas, heresy of, 246; relation of, to Paul of Samosata, 315.

Ascalon, 89, 92, 351.

Asclepiades, bishop of Antioch, 257, 269.

Asclepiodotus, a disciple of Theodotus the cobbler, 247, 248.

Asclepius, a martyr, 351.

Asia, 132, 136, 185, 186, 187, 188, 190, 192, 205, 206, 212, 219, 222, 223, 229, 230, 232, 236, 237, 238, 241, 242, 277, 310.

Asphaltites, Lake of, 95.

Asterius Urbanus, 232.

Astyrius, remarkable story in regard to, 304.

Ater, martyr under Dionysius, 284.

Atheists, Christians called, 190.

Athenagoras, author of a lost apology, 196 (note 3).

Athenians, 200, 206.

Athenodorus, brother of Gregory Thaumaturgus, 276, 303, 312.

Athens, 138, 201, 277.

Attalus, a Gallic witness in the persecution under Marcus Aurelius, 213, 215, 216, 218.

Attica, 321.

Atticus, proconsul of Judea, 164.

Atticus, bishop of Synada, 268.

Augustus, emperor of Rome, 88, 89, 90, 93, 96, 205.

Aurelian, becomes emperor, 313; petitioned to adjudicate the case of Paul of Samosata, 316; friendliness toward Christians, 316; plans to persecute Christians, 316; death of, 316.

Aurelius. See Marcus Aurelius.

Aurelius Cyrenius, a witness, 237.

Aurelius Cyrenius, imperial official in Egypt, 302.

Auses (Joshua), 85.

Autolycus, addressed by Theophilus, 202.

Auxentius, a martyr, 348.

Avercius Marcellus, addressed by Apolinarius, 230.

 

Babylas, bishop of Antioch, 275, 281.

Babylon, 90, 273.

Bacchius, grandfather of Justin, 185.

Bacchylides, 201.

Bacchylus, bishop of Corinth, 240, 241.

Baptism, 151 (note 16); clinical, received by Novatus, 288; called “seal” (σφραγίς), 289; discussion regarding baptism of heretics, 294–297; of the Church, rejected by Novatus, 297.

Baptism of John, 98.

Barabbas, the robber, 347.

Barcabbas, prophet invented by Basilides, 179.

Barcocheba, leader of the Jews, 177, 181.

Barcoph, prophet invented by Basilides, 179.

Bardesanes, the Syrian, works of, 209.

Barnabas, 310; one of the Seventy, 98, 104; called “prophet,” 107, 110, 113; probable author of Epistle to the Hebrews, 134 (note 17); epistle of, 260, 261; epistle of, placed among the νδθοι, 156.

Barsabas, 99 (note 10), 172.

Basilica of Tyre, 375 sq.

Basilicus, a Marcionite, 228.

Basilides, the Gnostic, 178; works of, 179.

Basilides, pupil of Origen, suffers martyrdom, 253.

Basilides, bishop in Pentapolis, addressed by Dionysius, 311.

Basilidians, 199.

Benjamin, bishop of Jerusalem, 176.

Bernice, church of, 311.

Beryllus, bishop of Bostra in Asia, 268; error of, 277; his conception of Christ, 277; brought back to orthodoxy by Origen, 277.

Berytus, now Beirut, 345.

Besas, martyr under Decius, 284.

Beseleel, 370, 373.

Bethlehem, 88, 94, 95.

Biblias, a Gallic witness in the persecution under Marcus Aurelius, 214.

Bishop, among the Therapeutæ, 119; relation of, to presbyter in the early church, 150; only one in a city, 287.

Bithynia, 132, 136, 294.

Bithara, fortress of, 177.

Blandina, a Gallic witness in the persecution under Marcus Aurelius, 213, 215–217.

Blastus, schism of, at Rome, 229, 237.

Bolanus, 313.

Bostra, in Arabia, 268, 277, 312.

Brethren of the Lord, 99 (note 14).

Brucheium. See Pyrucheium.

 

Cæcilianus, bishop of Carthage, 381, 382, 383.

Cæsarea in Cappadocia, 274, 303, 312.

Cæsarea in Palestine, 107, 111, 163, 240, 241, 255, 267, 268, 271, 274, 275, 277, 294, 303, 312, 320, 334, 343, 346, 347, 348, 349, 351, 352, 354.

Cæsarea Philippi, famous wonder at, 304.

Caiaphas, the high priest, 96, 97.

Caius, emperor of Rome, 107, 108; hostility of, toward the Jews, 109; alters temple, 109.

Caius, an ecclesiastical writer, 129; attitude of, towards the Apocalypse, 160 (note 4); dialogue of, 163, 268.

Caius, bishop of Rome, 317.

Callirhoĕ, a town east of the Dead Sea, 95.

Callistio, addressed by Rhodo, 228.

Callistus, bishop of Rome, 268.

Camithus, father of Simon the high priest, 97.

Candidus, an ecclesiastical writer, 245.

Canon, of N. T. Scriptures. See N. T. Canon. Of Old Testament. See O. T. Canon.

Capito, Gentile bishop of Jerusalem, 226.

Cappadocia, 132, 136, 257, 274, 291, 294, 295, 303, 312, 313, 332, 353, 354.

Caracalla, emperor of Rome, 255, 263, 268.

Caricus, receives letter from Serapion, 237, 258.

Carinus becomes emperor, 316.

Carpocrates, the Gnostic, 179.

Carpocatians, immorality of, 114 (note 18), 199.

Carpus, a martyr, 193.

Carthage, 294, 381, 382.

Carus, emperor of Rome, 316.

Cassianus, Gentile bishop of Jerusalem, 226.

Cassianus, an ecclesiastical writer, 260.

Cassius, bishop of Tyre, 244.

Catechumens, training of, 297 (note 3).

Cathari, followers of Novatus, 286.

Catholic Church, 380, 381, 383.

Catholic epistles, 128, 261.

Celadion, bishop of Alexandria, 184, 197.

Celerinus, a Roman confessor, 287.

Celibacy, preached by the Encratites, 208.

Celsus, the Epicurean, 268; work against, by Origen, 278.

Cemeteries of the Christians, 303, 358.

Cephas, one of the “Seventy,” 99.

Cephro, in Libya, 300, 301.

Cerdon, third bishop of Alexandria, 149.

Cerdon, the Gnostic, 182, 183.

Cerinthus, the heretic, 160, 161; avoided and denounced by John the Apostle, 187; chiliasm of, 309.

Chæremon, the Stoic, 266.

Chæremon, bishop of Nilus, 285.

Chæremon, a deacon, companion of Dionysius of Alexandria, 299, 300, 301.

Chiliasm, in the third century, 308 (note 1); of Cerinthus and the Cerinthians, 309.

Chrestus, bishop of Syracuse, 381.

Christ, pre-existence and divinity of, 82–85; the name of, known from the beginning, 85–87; divinity of, 86; types of, 86; time of his appearance among men, 88, 89; birth of, 88; genealogy of, 91–94; beginning of his ministry, 96; testimony of John the Baptist, in regard to, 98; spread of doctrine of, 107; predictions of, 141; family of, 148; age of, 150 (note 5); spoken of as God (θεολογείται), 247; taught to be God and man by Irenæus and Melito, 247; denial of, an indifferent matter according to the Elkesites, 280; body and blood of, 289; worshiped as “Very God,” 372; the bridegroom of the church, 376; dwells in the bishops and presbyters, 378; as high priest receives the sacrifices of his people and bears them to God, 378.

Christianity, antiquity and divinity of, 82 sq.

Christians, origin of name, 107; accusations against, 180; called Atheists, 190; mutilations of, 333; right of holding property guaranteed to them by Constantine and Licinius, 380; property of, restored by Constantine and Licinius, 380.

Christophany, 83 (note 11).

Chronicle of Eusebius, 82.

Chronological Canons of Eusebius. See Chronicle of Eusebius.

Chrysophora, addressed by Dionysius of Corinth, 202.

Church, the bride of Christ, 376, 377.

Church, Holy Catholic, 188, 189, 191, 299, 313, 315.

Churches, destruction of, under Diocletian, 324; restoration of, after the great persecution, 370; dedication of, 370 sq.

Cilicia, 291, 294, 295, 350, 351, 352.

Circumcision given to Abraham, 88.

Clarus, bishop of Ptolemais, 244.

Claudius I., emperor of Rome, 110, 114; drives Jews out of Rome, 121; death of, 122.

Claudius II., emperor of Rome, 313.

Claudius Apolinarius. See Apolinarius of Hierapolis.

Clement, of Alexandria, 99, 225, 226; Hypotyposes of, quoted, 104, 110, 125, 150, 161, 162; work of, on the Passover, 205; his Stromata, 225, 254; speaks of Christ as God, 247; succeeds Pantaenus as principal of the catechetical school of Alexandria, 253; gives chronological table extending to the reign of Commodus, 254; with Alexander of Jerusalem, 257; writings of, 258–261.

Clement, of Rome, third bishop of Church of Rome, 137, 149, 221; epistle of, 147, 169, 260; death of, 165; traditional translator of the Epistle to the Hebrews, 169; writings falsely ascribed to, 170; Epistle of, to the Corinthians, 198; read in the Corinthian Church in the time of Dionysius, 201; author of the Epistle to the Hebrews according to some, 273; his relation to the epistle according to Origen, 273.

Clement, consul of Rome. See Flavius Clement.

“Clementines.” See Clement of Rome.

Cleobians. See Cleobius.

Cleobius, a heretic, 199.

Cleopatra, 88.

Clergy, 289; exempted by Constantine from political duties, 383.

Clopas, father of Simeon and brother of Joseph, 146, 163, 164, 199.

Cnosians, inhabitants of Cnosus of Crete, 201.

Cochaba, a village of Judea, 93.

Cœle-Syria, 226.

Colluthion, 300.

Commodus, emperor of Rome, 224, 239, 240, 245, 254.

Confession of faith, attitude of Novatus towards, 297 (note 3).

Confessors, (δμόλογοι), 218; addressed by Novatus, 292.

Confirmation, 289 (note 25).

Conon, bishop of Hermopolis, 291.

Constantine, becomes emperor, 335; conquers Maxentius, 363, 364; enters Rome in triumph, 364; erects a statue in Rome with the cross in its hand, 364; issues in conjunction with Licinius an edict of toleration, 364, 365, 368; edict of toleration, copy of, 378–380; summons a synod at Rome, 381; summons a synod at Aries, 381; grants money to the churches, 382; favors shown by him to Licinius, 384; conquers Licinius, 386; becomes sole emperor and enjoys lasting peace and prosperity, 386, 387.

Constantius, joins Galerius in issuing an edict of toleration, 339; friendliness of, toward Christians, 335, 341; death of, 335, 341.

Coracion, a Chiliast, opposed by Dionysius, 309.

Corinth, church of, founded by Peter and Paul, 130, 138, 169, 197, 198, 200, 221, 242.

Corinthians, addressed by Paul, 199.

Cornelius, bishop of Antioch, 197.

Cornelius, bishop of Rome, 280, 293; epistles of, concerning Novatus, 286–287, 289, 290, 291.

Cornelius, the centurion, conversion of, 107.

Cornutus, a philosopher and rhetorician, 266.

Creed, of the Church, attitude of Novatus toward, 297 (note 3); early existence of, in the Roman Church, 297 (note 3).

Crescens, companion of Paul, 137.

Crescens, an enemy of Justin, 193, 194, 195.

Crete, 136, 197, 201.

Crispus, son of Constantine, 386.

Cronion Eunus, martyr under Decius, 284.

Cronius, a Pythagorean philosopher, 266.

Culcianus, a favorite of Maximin, 368.

Cumanus, procurator of Judea, 122 (note 1).

Cynics, life and manners of, 193.

Cyprian, epistles of, concerning the Novatian schism, 287; on rebaptism of heretics, 294, 296 (note 6).

Cyprus, 104, 355.

Cyrene, 174, 175.

Cyrenius, governor of Syria, census under, 88, 89.

Cyril, bishop of Antioch, 317.

 

Damas, bishop of Magnesia, 168.

Damascus, 359.

Damnæus, father of Jesus the high priest, 128.

Daniel, the prophet, 85, 90, 276, 352.

David, 86, 90.

Deacons, not to be identified with the “Seven,” 103 (note 2a); limited to seven in the Roman Church, 288 (note 18).

Decius, becomes emperor, 280; persecution under, 280–286, 301; slain, 293; wickedness of, 307, 326.

Demetrianus, bishop of Antioch, 303, 312, 315.

Demetrius, a Jewish writer, 260.

Demetrius, companion of Dionysius of Alexandria, 301.

Demetrius, bishop, addressed by the Emperor Gallienus, 302.

Demetrius, bishop of Alexandria, 240, 250, 254, 255, 262, 267, 268, 274, 275, 291, 294; hostility of, to Origen, 255; relations of, with Origen discussed, 394.

Desposyni, or the relatives of Christ, 93.

Diaconal epistle of Dionysius, 291.

Diaconate, 103, 104; among the Therapeutœ, 119.

Diatessaron, of Tatian, 209.

Didymus, addressed by Dionysius of Alexandria, 301, 305.

Diocletian, becomes emperor, 316; persecution of, 316; friendliness of, toward Christians, 323; first edict of, against Christians, 324, 342; second edict of, against Christians, 325, 342; third edict of, against Christians, 325, 328, 342; abdication of, 335, 340, 345; death of, 340; martyrs under, in Palestine, 342; so-called fourth edict of, issued by Maximian, 344 (note 2); so-called fifth edict of, issued by Galerius and Maximinus, 350 (note 1), 364, 366; causes of the persecution of, discussed, 397–400.

Dionysia, martyr under Decius, 284.

Dionysius, the Areopagite, 137; first bishop of Athens, 138, 200.

Dionysius, bishop of Alexandria, quoted, 160, 281, 283–286, 300; succeeds Heraclas as principal of the catechetical school, 275, 278; epistle of, to Germanus, 281; sufferings of, during the Decian persecution, 282, 301, 302; epistle of, to Fabius, 283–286, 290; attitude of, toward the lapsed, 283 (note 1), 285, 286, 290; his account of Serapion, 290; epistle of, to Novatus, 290, 291; various epistles of, 291, 311, 312; on Repentance, 291; on Martyrdom, 291; against Novatus, 291; epistles of, on the re-baptism of the lapsed, 294, 295, 296, 297; appealed to by Eusebius as an authority, 293, 318; on Sabellius and his heresy, 295, 311; attitude of, toward heretical teachings, 295; on the persecution under Valerian, 298–302; sufferings of, during persecution under Valerian, 299–301; addressed by the Emperor Gallienus, 302; festal epistles of, 305, 307; Paschal canon of, 305; on the Sabbath, 307; to Hermammon, 307; on the Promises, 308; on the Apocalypse of John, 309; to Ammon of Bernice, 311; to Telesphorus, Euphranor, and Euporus, 311; on Nature, on Temptations, Exposition of Ecclesiastes, 311; to Dionysius of Rome, to Basilides of Pentapolis, 311; invited to attend synod called against Paul of Samosata, 312; death of, 313, 321.

Dionysius, bishop of Corinth, 130, 197, 202; epistles of, 200, 201.

Dionysius of Rome, 295, 296, 311, 312, 313, 316.

Dionysius, a martyr of Palestine, 345.

Dioscorus, companion of Dionysius of Alexandria, 301.

Dioscorus, confessor under Decius, 284, 285.

Disciples, careers of, after ascension of Christ, 132.

Dispensation (οίκογομία) of Christ, 81, 82.

Dispersion, Hebrews of the, 136.

Dius, bishop of Jerusalem, 256.

Dius, a martyr, 334.

Divinity of Christ (θε ολογία), discussed by Eusebius, 8286.

Divinity of Christianity, 82 sq.

Docetæ, 258.

Dolichianus, Gentile bishop of Jerusalem, 226.

Domitian, becomes emperor, 147; persecution under, 147, 148, 205, 222; commands that descendants of David be slain, 148, 150, 163, 164.

Domitius, addressed by Dionysius of Alexandria, 301, 305.

Domninus, an apostate, addressed by Serapion, 257.

Domninus, a martyr, 348.

Domnus, bishop of Antioch, 315, 316, 317.

Domnus, bishop of Cæsarea, 303.

Donatist schism, 380 (note 16), 383 (note 12).

Dorotheus, presbyter of Antioch, 317.

Dorotheus, a member of Diocletian’s household, 323, 327.

Dositheans. See Dositheus.

Dositheus, a heretic, 199.

 

Ebionites, heresy of, 158–160, 223, 264; relation of, to the Elkeites, 280.

Ecclesiastes, commentary on, by Dionysius, 311.

Eden, 306.

Edessa, visit of Thaddeus to, 100–102; Christianity introduced into, 100–102, 104.

Egypt, 88, 93, 94, 95, 174, 175, 226, 249, 250, 267, 291, 298, 299, 300, 301, 305, 307, 308, 328, 329, 334, 351, 355, 360, 368.

Egyptian false prophet, mentioned in the Acts, sedition of, 123.

Egyptian nation, 305.

Elagabalus, Roman emperor, 268, 269.

Elders, account of appointment of, in Acts vi., 103 (note 2a); “The Ancient Elders,” 133, 171.

Eleazer, the high priest, 97.

Eleazer of Bathezor, 140.

Eleutheropolis, 350, 351.

Eleutherus, bishop of Rome, 184, 199, 211, 219–221, 240.

Eli, son of Melchi, 91, 92, 94.

Elias, a martyr, 351.

Elijah, 352.

Elkesites, heresy of, 280.

Elpistus, of Amastris, 201.

Emesa, 334.

Emesa in Phœnicia, 360.

Encratites, 207, 208.

Ennathas, a martyr, 350.

Enoch, book of. 310.

Ephesus, 162, 163, 167, 171, 186, 187, 196, 222, 223, 236, 237, 241, 242, 310; church of, founded by Paul, 150.

Ephres, bishop of Jerusalem, 176.

Epimachus, martyr under Decius, 284.

Epistles, of the Apostles, 133; Catholic, 261; thirteen of Paul, 268.

Eros, bishop of Antioch, 197.

Essenes, Jewish sect, 199.

Estha, wife of Matthan and Melchi, 91.

Ethiopia, Christianity introduced into, 105 (note 30), 347.

Ethiopian eunuch, conversion of, 105.

Eubulus, a martyr, 354.

Eucharist, the, 243, 290.

Euclid, studied by the Theodotians, 248.

Euelpis, 268.

Eumenes, bishop of Alexandria, 177, 184.

Eumenia, 233, 242.

Eunuchs, eligibility of, to clerical offices, 317 (note 12).

Eunus. See Cronion Eunus.

Euphranor, addressed by Dionysius, 311.

Euphrates river, 100.

Eupolemus, a Jewish writer, 260.

Euporus, addressed by Dionysius, 311.

Eusebius, claim of, to be called the “Father of Church History,” 81 (note 5); Canon of, 155–157.

Eusebius of Alexandria, a deacon and companion of Dionysius of Alexandria, 299, 301, 302; becomes bishop of Laodicea, 302, 318; conduct of, during the siege of the Pyrucheium, 319, 320; death of, 320.

Eutychianus, bishop of Rome, 317.

Eutychius, 313.

Evangelists, still eminent in time of Trajan, 169.

Evarestus, bishop of Rome, 165, 174, 221.

Evodius, first bishop of Antioch, 149.

Exodus, the, 319.

Exorcists, 288.

Ezekiel, Origen’s commentary on, 277.

Ezra, the Jewish priest, 224.

 

Fabi, father of Ishmael the high priest, 97.

Fabianus, miraculously chosen bishop of Rome, 274–275; Origen’s epistle to, 279; suffers martyrdom, 280.

Fabius, bishop of Antioch, 281, 303; epistle of Dionysius to, 283; epistle of Cornelius to, 286–287, 290.

Fadus, procurator of Judea, 112, 113.

False prophets of the Phrygians. See Montanists.

Famine, under Claudius, 110; in Jerusalem, 139–141.

Faustinus, companion of Dionysius of Alexandria, 301, 334.

Faustus, companion of Dionysius of Alexandria, 282, 299, 300, 301, 302.

Felix, procurator, 122; subdues Egyptian false prophet, 123.

Felix, bishop of Rome, 316, 317.

Fertur, φέρεται, the use of the word in connection with writings, discussed, 388 sq.

Festus, procurator of Judea, 123, 125.

Firmilian, bishop of Cæsarea in Cappadocia, 274, 291, 294, 295, 303, 312, 313; attitude of, toward Paul of Samosata, 314; death of, 314.

Firmilianus, governor of Palestine, 349, 350, 352, 353, 354.

Flavia Domitilla, 148.

Flavia Neapolis, 185.

Flavianus, governor of Palestine, 342.

Flavius, addressed by Dionysius, 305.

Flavius Clement, consul of Rome, 148.

Flavius Josephus. See Josephus.

Florinus, schism of, at Rome, 229, 237, 238.

Florus. See Gessius Florus.

Frumentius, introduces Christianity into Ethiopia, 105 (note 30).

Fundanus, proconsul and governor of Asia, 206.

 

Gaius I., Gentile bishop of Jerusalem, 226.

Gaius II., Gentile bishop of Jerusalem, 226.

Gaius, martyr of Eumenia, 233.

Gaius, companion of Dionysius of Alexandria, 282.

Galatia, 132, 136, 230, 295.

Galatians, Epistle of Paul to, 99.

Galba, Roman emperor, 138.

Galen, reverenced by the Theodotians, 248.

Galerius, fatal illness of, 338; his edict of toleration, 339, 340, 356; effect of it upon Christians, 357, 358; original author of the Diocletian persecution, 340; death of, 340; fifth edict of, 350.

Galilean, 89.

Galileans, Jewish sect, 199.

Galilee, 88, 95.

Gallienus, emperor of Rome, 300, 313; peace under, 302, 307.

Gallus, becomes emperor, 293; epistle of Dionysius to, 293; persecutes Christians, 293.

Gamala, a city of Gaulonitis, 89.

Gamaliel, 112.

Gaul, 137, 198, 211, 216, 242, 243, 381.

Gaulonite. See Judas the Gaulonite.

Gaza, 334, 344, 345, 349, 355.

Genealogy of Christ, alleged discrepancy in the Gospels in regard to, 91–94, 277.

Gentiles, divine word attacked by, 81; preached to by Paul, 136.

Geon, one of the rivers of Eden, 306.

Georæ, the strangers that went out of Egypt with the Israelites, 93.

Germanicus, martyr of Smyrna, 189.

Germanio, bishop of Jerusalem, 256.

Germans, the, 219.

Germanus, epistle to, from Dionysius, 281, 299, 301.

Germanus, a martyr, 350.

Germany, 220.

Gessius Florus, Procurator of Judea, 130.

Gitto, a village of Samaria, 114.

Gnosticism, 179; commonly misunderstood, 114 (note 17).

Gomorrah, 83.

Goratheni. See Gorthæus.

Gordianus, emperor of Rome, 274, 278.

Gordius, bishop of Jerusalem, 256.

Gorgonius, a member of Diocletian’s household, 323.

Gorthæus, a heretic, 199.

Gortyna, 201, 203.

Gospel, why not preached in ancient times, 84.

Gospels, Irenæus on the, 222; of Matthew, see Matthew; of Mark, see Mark; of Luke, see Luke; of John, see John; order of, 152, 155; of the Nazarenes, see Nazarenes; according to the Hebrews, see Hebrews, Gospel of; of Peter, see Peter; order of the, according to Clement, 261; the four, 273; used by the Elkesites, 280.

Gratus, proconsul of Asia, 231.

Greece, 226, 240.

Greek learning, 276.

Gregory, “the Illuminator,” the apostle of Armenia, 362 (note 2).

Gregory Thaumaturgus, 275, 303, 312.

 

Hades, descent of Christ into, 102.

Hadrian becomes Emperor, 175, 176; war of the Jews under, 177, 180, 226; rescript in favor of Christians, 181, 182, 206; friendliness toward the Christians, 220.

Hebrew Gospel of Matthew, 222.

Hebrew nation, antiquity of, 87.

Hebrews, 84, 87, 98; of the dispersion, 136.

Hebrews, Epistle to; not included among Paul’s Epistles by Caius, 268; authorship of, 388; according to Origen, 273; referred to as Paul’s, 117, 134; canonicity of, view of Eusebius, 155, 159, 173, 260, 278; placed among the νδθοι, 156, 169; used by Hegesippus, 200; mentioned by Irenæus, 244.

Hebrews, Gospel of, written originally in Hebrew, and translated by Luke, 261.

Hegesippus, memoirs of, used by Eusebius, 81 (note 5); account of death of James, the Lord’s brother, 125–127; visits Rome, 184, 198; quoted, 146, 148, 149, 163, 164, 180, 197, 198, 199.

Helen, Queen of the Osrhœnians, 113.

Helena, companion of Simon Magus, 114; worshiped by his followers, 114.

Helenus, bishop of Tarsus, 291, 295, 312, 313.

Heliodorus, of Laodicea, 294.

Hemerobaptists, Jewish sect, 199.

Heraclas, pupil of Origen, and his successor in the catechetical school of Alexandria, 251, 262, 274; successor of Dementrius as bishop of Alexandria, 251, 274, 275, 297; earnest student of Greek philosophy, 267; removes to Cæsarea, 274; visited by Africanus, 276; dies, 278; opinion of on the re-baptism of heretics, 296.

Heracleides, imperial treasurer under Constantine, 383.

Heraclides, pupil of Origen, martyrdom of, 252.

Heraclitus, an ecclesiastical writer, 245.

Herais, pupil of Origen, martyrdom of, 252.

Heresy, Phrygian. See Montanism.

Heretics, arise after the death of the apostles, 164, 202; re-baptism of, 294–297.

Hermammon, addressed by Dionysius of Alexandria, 298, 307.

Hermas, Shepherd of, 135, 223; placed among the νδθοι, 156.

Hermogenes, written against by Theophilus, 202.

Hermon, bishop of Jerusalem, 321.

Hermophilus, a follower of Theodotus the cobbler, 248.

Hermopolis, 291.

Hero, bishop of Antioch, 197.

Hero, pupil of Origen, martyrdom of, 252.

Herod of Ascalon, 89, 92.

Herod the Great, becomes king, 89, 90, 93; lineage of, 93; cruelty toward the infants, 94; death of, 94, 95; succeeded by Archelaus, 96; puts John to death, 98; fears the coming of Christ, 149.

Herod the Younger, or Herod Antipas, 96; exiled with Herodias, 107.

Herod Agrippa I., appointed king of the Jews, 107; kills James, and imprisons Peter, 111; eaten of worms, 111; death of, 112.

Herod Agrippa II., appointed king of the Jews by Claudius, 122; deprives Ananus of the high priesthood, 128; testifies to the truthfulness of Josephus, 146.

Herod, the Eirenarch, 191.

Herodias, wife of Philip and of Herod Antipas, 97, 98.

Heron, martyr under Decius, 284.

Hesychius, Egyptian bishop and martyr, 334.

Hexæmeron, work of Hippolytus on the, 270; works by Candidus and various Fathers on the, 245.

Hexapla, of Origen, 263.

Hierapolis, burial-place of Philip, 162, 163, 165, 172, 206, 230, 237, 242.

Hierax, a bishop in Egypt, addressed by Dionysius, 305, 313.

Hippolytus, a bishop and ecclesiastical writer, 268; writings of, 269, 270; Paschal canon of, 270; work of, on the Hexæmeron, 270; against Marcion, 270; on the Song of Songs, 270; on Ezekiel, 270; on the Passover, 270; against all heresies, 270.

Hippolytus, a messenger by whom Dionysius sends an epistle to Rome, 291.

Homologoumena (δμολογούμενα), meaning of, as used by Eusebius, 155 (note 1).

Hosius of Cordova, 383.

Hyginus, bishop of Rome, 182, 183, 221, 242.

Hymenæus, bishop of Jerusalem, 303, 312, 313, 321.

Hymns, celebrating Christ as God, 247.

Hypotyposes, of Clement. See Clement of Alexandria.

Hyrcanus, high priest of the Jews, 90, 92.

 

Iconium, 268, 312; synod of, 296.

Idea, Gnostic, 114 (note 13).

Idumean, 89, 90, 92.

Ignatius, second bishop of Antioch, 149, 165; epistles of, 166–169; martyrdom of, 166–169; quoted, 223.

Illyricum, 121, 132, 136, 273, 356.

India, 225, 347.

Ingenes, martyr under Decius, 285.

Ionian, spoken of by Clement of Alexandria, 225.

Irenæus, 114, 158, 172, 178, 179, 199, 242, 244, 260; life and writings of, 198, 244; writes against Marcion, 203; quoted, 148, 150, 168, 170, 182, 183, 187, 188, 197, 207, 209, 223, 224, 238, 239; recommended by the Gallic confessors, 219; becomes bishop of Lyons, 220; his catalogue of the bishops of Rome, 221; gives an account of post-apostolic miracles, 221; his work against heresies, 221; on the Scriptures, 222–224; writes against Blastus and Florinus, 237; on Monarchy, 238; on the Ogdoad, 238; admonishes Victor not to excommunicate the Asiatic church, 243; teaches that Christ is God and man, 247.

Isaac, 8387.

Isaiah, 86, 299, 307, 352; commentary on, by Origen, 277.

Ischyrion, slain by his master for not sacrificing, 285.

Ishmael, the high priest, 97.

Isidorus, martyr under Decius, 284.

Israel, 83, 91, 93, 306, 324, 352.

Italy, 286, 287, 316, 356.

 

Jacob, the patriarch, 83, 87.

Jacob, son of Matthan, 91, 92, 94.

James, the son of Zebedee, death of, 104, 110, 111, 138; cited as an authority by Papias, 171; by Clement of Alexandria, 226; brother of John the apostle, 309, 310.

James, the so-called brother of the Lord, 99; called the Just by the ancients, 104; why called brother of the Lord, 104; made first bishop of Jerusalem, 104, 142, 146, 176, 199; death of, 104; martyrdom of, 125–128, 138; epistle of, placed among the Antilegomena, 156; episcopal chair of, preserved until the time of Eusebius, 305.

Jamna, 352.

Janitors, 288.

Jeremiah, 85, 324, 352.

Jericho, 83, 95, 263.

Jerusalem, 90, 100, 132, 136, 165, 177, 223, 235, 241, 255, 256, 257, 268, 273, 274, 291, 303, 310, 321, 352, 370, 378.

Jerusalem, church of, persecuted, 104, 280, 281, 312; bishops of, belonging to the circumcision, 176; Gentile bishops of, 226, 240; full table of bishops of, down to time of Eusebius, 302.

Jesus, the name of, known from the beginning, 85–87; statue of, erected by the woman with an issue of blood, 304.

Jesus (Joshua), 85, 90.

Jesus, the high priest, 128.

Jesus, son of Ananias, 142.

Jesus, son of Sirach, “Wisdom of,” 260.

Jews, 90, 92, 93, 95, 96, 98, 101, 224, 234; misfortunes of, in consequence of plots against Christ, 81; first persecution of, 104; driven out of Rome by Claudius, 121; calamity at feast of Passover under Claudius, 122; disturbances under Nero, 122, 123; last war of, against the Romans, 130, 131; calamities of, under Trajan, 174; war of, under Hadrian, 177, 181; assist in persecuting Christians at Smyrna, 190–192; Justin writes against, 196; mutilate the Scriptures, 197; heresies among, 199.

John the Baptist, 96, 153; testimony of Josephus in regard to, 97, 98.

John, the apostle, 104, 163, 170, 171, 226, 236, 239, 242, 244, 309, 310; receives his revelation in the time of Domitian, 222; labors in Asia, and dies at Ephesus, 132, 138; banished to Patmos, 148; after banishment, resides in Ephesus, 149, 150; narrative of, 150; writings of, 154; speaks against Cerinthus, 161, 187; death and burial place, 162; two monuments of, in Ephesus, 310; same marks in Gospel and epistle of, 311; Gospel of, 152, 222, 261, 273, 309; reason for composition of, 153; commentary on, by Origen, 271;. compared with the Apocalypse by Dionysius, 310; First Epistle of, 173, 222, 309; a part of the N. T. Canon, 156; Second and Third Epistles of, placed among the Antilegomena, 156; discussed by Dionysius, 310; Acts of, 157; Apocalypse of, work on, by Melito, 204; spoken of, by Irenæus, 222; by Apollonius, 236; by Origen, 273; by Nepos, 308; by Dionysius, 309; authorship of, assigned to Cerinthus, 309; author of, 310.

John, surnamed Mark, 310.

John, bishop of Jerusalem, 176.

John, the presbyter, friend of Papias, 170 (note 4), 171, 172.

John, a confessor, wonderful memory of, 355.

Jonathan, the high priest, 123.

Jordan, river, 95, 304.

Joseph, the father of Christ, 91, 92, 94, 95, 104, 146, 223, 264.

Joseph, bishop of Jerusalem, 176.

Joseph Barsabbas. See Barsabbas.

Josephus, 88, 90, 96, 97, 107; quoted, 89, 94, 95, 98, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 122, 127, 138, 139, 260, 319; testimonies of, in regard to John the Baptist, and Christ, 97, 98; on the death of James the Just, 127, 128; work of, on the Jewish War, 130, 131; life and works of, 143; O. T. Canon of, 144.

Josephus Caiaphas. See Caiaphas.

Joshua, 83.

Judah, 89, 90.

Judas (Iscariot), 99.

Judas, candidate with Matthias, 103, 172.

Judas, the prophet, 234.

Judas, bishop of Jerusalem, 176.

Judas, an ecclesiastical writer, 254.

Judas of Galilee, or Judas the Gaulonite, 88, 89.

Judas Thomas. See Thomas.

Jude, brother of the Lord, 148, 164; Epistle of, 128, 260, 261; placed among the Antilegomena, 156.

Judea, 88, 93, 94, 95, 96, 100, 104, 175.

Julian, bishop of Alexandria, 224, 240, 250.

Julian, bishop of Apamea.

Julian I., Gentile bishop of Jerusalem, 226.

Julian II., Gentile bishop of Jerusalem, 226.

Julian, martyr under Decius, 284.

Julian, a Cappadocian martyr, 354.

Juliana, friend of Origen, 264.

Jupiter Philius, 359.

Justin, apology of, quoted, 114, 158, 180, 181, 184, 185, 193, 195, 196, 223; work against Marcion, 184; against heresies, 185; martyrdom of, 193; works of, 196, 197, 208; speaks of Christ as God, 247.

Justus, bishop of Alexandria, 176.

Justus, bishop of Jerusalem, 165, 176.

Justus of Tiberias, 145.

Justus Barsabbas. See Barsabbas.

 

κλήρογ, used in the sense of “order” or “class,” 213.

Knowledge, “falsely so-called,” 81, 178, 221, 317.

 

Lacedæmonians, 200.

Lætus, governor of Alexandria, 250.

Laity, 286, 287, 289.

Laodicea, 205, 242, 291, 294, 318, 319, 320.

Lapsed, the, attitude of Dionysius toward, 283 (note 1), 285 (note 6); attitude of Novatus toward, 286; attitude of Cornelius and the church of Rome toward, 286; controversy concerning, 293 (note 3).

Laranda, 268.

Larissæans, 206.

Latronianus, corrector of Sicily, 382.

Lebanon, 355, 375.

Leonides, father of Origen, 249.

Levi, bishop of Jerusalem, 176.

Levi, tribe of, 224.

Liberty, full religious, granted by Constantine and Licinius, 379.

Libya, 300, 301, 355.

Licinius, becomes emperor, 335; joins Galerius in issuing an edict of toleration, 339; conquers Maximin, 363, 366; issues in conjunction with Constantine an edict of toleration, 364, 365; puts to death the favorites and the children of Maximin, 386; edict of toleration, text of, 378–380; plots against Constantine, 384; persecutes the Christians, 384–386; extortions and cruel laws of, 385; conquered by Constantine, 386.

Linus, bishop of Rome, 132, 137, 147, 149, 221.

λόγια, of Papias, 170; of Matthew, 173.

Longinus, a philosopher and rhetorician, 266.

Lucian, presbyter of Antioch, 333, 360.

Lucius (Verus), emperor of Rome, 185, 188.

Lucius, a martyr, 195, 196.

Lucius, bishop of Rome, 293.

Lucius, companion of Dionysius of Alexandria, 301, 313.

Lucius Quintus, a Roman general, 175.

Lucuas, leader of the Jews, 174, 175.

Luke, on the genealogy of Christ, 91, 92, 277; author of the Acts, 112, 136, 137; wrote Acts during Paul’s imprisonment, 124, 273; parentage and profession of, 136; Gospel of, 136, 137, 153, 222, 273; reason for composition of the Gospel, 154, 163; traditional translator of the Epistle to the Hebrews, 169, 261; author of the Epistle to the Hebrews according to some, 273.

Lupus, governor of Egypt, 174.

Lycia, 345.

Lyons, account of Martyrs of, 211; Epistle of Church of, 212, 220.

Lysanias, Tetrarch of Abilene, 96, 107.

 

Macar, a Libyan, martyr under Decius, 284.

Macedonian months, table of, 403.

Macedonians, 223.

Machæra, citadel of, 98.

Macrianus, financial minister of Valerian, 298.

Macrinus, becomes emperor, 268, 307.

Mæander, 168, 233.

Magi, the visit of, to Christ, 94.

Magna Græcia, 226.

Magnesia, 168.

Malchion, a Sophist, opponent of Paul of Samosata, 313.

Malchus, martyr at Cæsarea, under Valerian, 302.

Mambre, oak of, 83.

Mammæa, mother of Emperor Alexander Severus, has an interview with Origen, 269.

Manes, 316; proclaims himself the Paraclete, 317.

Manganea, probably northeast of Palestine, 354.

Manichæans, heresy of, 316, 317.

Marcella, mother of Potamiæna, martyrdom of, 253.

Marcellinus, bishop of Rome, 317.

Marcellus, companion of Dionysius of Alexandria, 300.

Marcian, a friend of Irenæus, 244.

Marcianus, a heretic, 258.

Marcion, asceticism of, 114 (note 18); heresy of, 182, 183, 233; Justin’s work against, 184, 197; meets Polycarp in Rome, 187, 201; written against by Theophilus, 202; mentioned by Tatian, 208; written against by Bardesanes, 210; work against, promised by Irenæus, 223; written against by Rhodo, 227; holds two principles, 228; a martyr of the sect of, at Cæsarea under Valerian, 302; and in Palestine, 351.

Marcionists, 199.

Marcionites, 233.

Marcius Turbo, a Roman general, 174.

Marcus, bishop of Alexandria, 184.

Marcus, first Gentile bishop of Jerusalem, 178, 226.

Marcus, addressed by Constantine, 381.

Marcus, the Gnostic, 183.

Marcus Aurelius, 106, 185, 186, 188, 196, 197, 205, 210, 211, 219, 220, 224; Eusebius’ confusion in regard to, discussed, 390, 391.

Mareotis in Egypt, 300, 301.

Mareotis, lake of, 118.

Maria, lake of. See Mareotis.

Marinus of Aries, 381.

Marinus, a martyr at Cæsarea, 303.

Marinus of Tyre, 294.

Mark, the Evangelist, 128; preaches in Egypt, 116, 310; interpreter of Peter, 172, 173, 222; Gospel of, 115, 153, 261, 273; composition of Gospel of, 116.

Marriage, pronounced fornication by Tatian, 208.

Mars, 360.

μδρτνς, 164, 213, 218, 237.

Martyrdom, Dionysius of Alexandria on, 291.

Martyrdoms, collection of, 211. See Ancient Martyrdoms.

Martyrdoms of the Ancients. See Ancient Martyrdoms.

Martyrs, in Palestine, under Diocletian, 342–356; in Alexandria, under Decius, 283; in Cæsarea, under Valerian, 302.

Mary, the mother of Christ, 94, 264.

Mary, daughter of Eleazar, 140.

Mary, wife of Clopas, 164.

Masbotheans, Jewish sect, 199.

Masbotheus, a heretic, 199.

Maternus of Cologne, 381.

Mattathias, father of Josephus, 143.

Matthew, the Apostle, 91, 92, 94; wrote a Hebrew Gospel, 152, 173, 222, 225; Gospel of, used by the Ebionites, 159 (note 8), 171; Gospel of, found by Bartholomew in India, 225; Gospel of, written first in Hebrew, 273; commentary on Gospel of, by Origen, 279; on the genealogy of Christ, 91, 92, 277.

Matthias, chosen to the Apostolate, 99, 103, 172; ascetic teaching of, 161; one of the Seventy, 103; Gospel of, excluded from the Canon, 157.

Matthias, bishop of Jerusalem, 176.

Maturus, a Gallic witness in the persecution under Marcus Aurelius, 213, 215.

Mauritania, 328, 356, 382.

Maxentius, usurps the imperial purple, 335 (note 21), 336; character of, 336; his treatment of female Christians, 337; defeated by Constantine, 363, 364.

Maximian, treatment of female Christians, 332 (note 2); fourth edict of, against Christians, 332 (note 2), 344 (note 2); abdication of, 335, 340, 345; conspires against Constantine and meets a shameful death, 336, 340, 364, 366.

Maximilla, Montanist prophetess, 229, 231 (note 18), 232, 233, 234, 236.

Maximinus, bishop of Antioch, 202, 237.

Maximinus I., Roman emperor, 274.

Maximinus II., treatment of female Christians, 332 (note 2), 337; seizes the imperial dignity, 336; character of, 336; persecution of, 345–355; fifth edict of. 350; gives verbal orders to relax the persecution, 357; renews the persecution, 358–361; decree of against the Christians engraved on pillars, 360; famine, pestilence, and war, during the reign of, 362; first edict of toleration, 364, 365; defeated by Licinius, 366; second edict of toleration, 366, 367; death of, 367; honors of, revoked after his death by Constantine and Licinius, 368; children of, put to death, 368.

Maximus, bishop of Alexandria, 299, 300, 301, 302, 313, 321.

Maximus, bishop of Bostra, 312.

Maximus, Gentile bishop of Jerusalem, 226.

Maximus, a Roman confessor, 287.

Maxys, a military tribune, 350.

Mazabanes, bishop of Jerusalem, 281, 294, 303.

Melchi, father of Eli, 91, 92, 94.

Melchizedec, 86, 373.

Meletius, bishop in Pontus, 321; called “honey of Attica,” 320.

Melitene, in Cappadocia, 328.

Melitene legion, the so-called “Thundering Legion,” 219.

Melito, bishop of Sardis, 186; life and writings of, 198, 203–206, 242, 261; teaches Christ is God and man, 247.

Menander, the sorcerer, successor of Simon Magus, 157, 158, 178.

Menandrianists, 199.

Mercuria, martyr under Decius, 284.

Merozanes, bishop of Armenia, 291.

Mesopotamia, 175, 294, 332.

Metras, martyr under Decius, 283.

Metrodorus, Marcionite martyr at Smyrna, 192.

Micah, the prophet, 94.

Milan, edict of, 379, 380.

Miltiades, writings of, 233, 234; writes against Montanists, 234; speaks of Christ as God, 247.

Miltiades, bishop of Rome, addressed by Constantine, 381.

Miltiades, a Montanist, 230.

Minucius Fundanus, proconsul of Asia, receives rescript from Hadrian in favor of Christians, 181, 182.

Miracles, of the Post-Apostolic age, 221; of Narcissus of Jerusalem, 255.

Moabitess. See Ruth the Moabitess.

Moderatus, a Pythagorean philosopher, 266.

Modestus, 197; writes against Marcion, 203.

Monarchy, work on, by Irenæus, 238.

Montanism, 103, 207, 229–237, 268.

Montanists, false prophets of, 229.

Montanus, 218, 229, 232, 233, 234, 235, 236.

Months, table showing Roman method of computing the days of, 402; table of Macedonian, 403.

Moses, 82, 83, 84, 85, 87, 94, 145, 224, 239, 319, 363, 364; shown by Tatian to be older than the most celebrated Greeks, 209, 260; “Harmony of,” 267; murmured against, 305.

Moses, a Roman confessor, 289.

Musæus, 319.

Musanus, 197, 207.

Mysia, 231.

 

Narcissus, Gentile bishop of Jerusalem, 226, 240, 241, 244, 257; miracles of, 255; goes into retirement, 256; comes out of retirement, 256.

Natalius, bishop of the sect of Theodotus, 247.

Nathan, son of David, 91, 92, 94.

Nature, work on, by Dionysius, 311.

Nave, father of Joshua, 85.

Nazara, a village of Judea, 93.

Nazarenes, Gospel of, 168 (note 15).

Nebuchadnezzar, 224.

Nemesion, an Egyptian, martyr under Decius, 285.

Neon, 268.

Neo-Platonism, 264 (note 1).

Nepos, schism of, 308, 309.

Nero, succeeds Claudius, 122; more cruel in his later years, 125 (note 15); persecutions and crimes of, 128, 129, 138, 147, 149, 163, 205.

Nerva, becomes emperor, 149.

New Testament Canon, 133, 155, 273.

Nicetes, father of the Eirenarch Herod, 191.

Nicolaitans. See Nicolaus, sect of.

Nicolaus, sect of, 161.

Nicomachus, a Pythagorean philosopher, 266.

Nicomas, bishop of Iconium in Lycaonia, 312, 313.

Nicomedia, 333, 360, 365; persecutions in, under Diocletian, 326, 327, 328; fire in palace of, 327.

Nicomedians, 201.

Nicopolis, near Actium, 263.

Nilus, in Egypt, 285.

Nilus, an Egyptian bishop and martyr, 334, 355.

Noah, 82, 306.

νόθοδ, Eusebius’ use of, 128 (note 46), 155 (note 1).

Nomes, of Egypt, 118.

Novatian. See Novatus.

Novatus, 294; schism of, 286–290, 296; attitude of, toward the lapsed, 286; Cornelius writes epistles concerning, 286; epistle of Cyprian concerning, 286; character of, according to Cornelius, 287; character of, 287 (note 13); ordination of, to the episcopate, 288, 290; addressed by Dionysius, 290, 291; attitude of, toward Catholic baptism, 297.

Novatus, a presbyter of Carthage, 289 (note 29).

Numenius, a philosopher and rhetorician, 266.

Numerianus, becomes emperor, 316.

Numidia, 382.

 

Œdipodean intercourse, 213.

Ogdoad, work on, by Irenæus, 238.

οίκογομία. See Dispensation of Christ.

Old Testament Canon, according to Josephus, 144, 155, 206; according to Melito, 206; according to Origen, 272; used by the Elkesites, 280.

Olympiads, 110.

Onesimus, pastor of church of Ephesus, 168.

Onesimus, addressed by Melito, 206.

Ophites, immorality of, 114 (note 18).

Oracles of the Lord. See λόγια.

Oracles of Matthew. See λόγια.

Origen, quoted, 133, 264; training of, 249; eager for martyrdom, 250; proficient in the Scriptures while yet a boy, 250; refuses to join in prayer with heretics, 250; takes charge of the catechetical school of Alexandria, 251; proficiency in secular literature, 251; shows bravery during the persecution, but escapes all harm, 251; asceticism of, 252; pupils of, suffering martyrdom, 252; studies under Clement, 253; makes himself a eunuch, 254; ordained a presbyter, 255, 271; accused by Demetrius, 255; addressed by Alexander, 261; earnest study of the Scriptures, 262; his Hexapla, 263; his Tetrapla, 263; his learning attracts many students, including heretics and philosophers, 264; slandered by Porphyry, 265; allegorical interpretation of the Scriptures, 266 (note 1); proficiency in Grecian learning, 267; visits Arabia, 267; preaches in Cæsarea, 267; visits Mammæa, mother of Emperor Alexander Severus, at Antioch, 269; his great zeal in composing commentaries, 271; commentaries prepared by him at Alexandria, 271; visits Greece on ecclesiastical business, 271; passes through Palestine, 271; commentary on the Gospel of John, 271; on Genesis, 271, 272; on the Psalms, 272; on Lamentations, 272; works on the Resurrection, 272; De Principiis, 272; his Old Testament Canon, 272; friendship of Palestinian bishops towards, 274; work on martyrdom, 274; pupils of, in Cæsarea, 275; epistle of, to Africanus, 276; his commentaries, composed in Cæsarea in Palestine, 277; on Isaiah, 277; on Ezekiel, 277; second visit to Athens, 277; on the Song of Songs, 277; brings Beryllus back to the orthodox faith, 277; apology for, by Eusebius and Pamphilus, 271, 278; work of, against Celsus, 278; permits his discourses to be taken by stenographers, 278; commentaries of, on Matthew and the minor prophets, 279; various epistles of, 279; heals dissension of the Arabians, 279; on the Elkesites, 280; sufferings of, in persecution under Decius, 281; addressed by Dionysius on the subject of martyrdom, 291; school of, 303; life and writings of, discussed, 391–394; relations of, with Demetrius, discussed, 394, 395; visit to Greece, cause and date of, discussed, 395–397; final departure of, from Alexandria discussed, 395–397; ordination of, discussed, 397.

Osrhœne, 242.

Osrhœnians, Gospel preached to, 104.

Otho, Roman emperor, 138.

Otrous, or Otrys, in Phrygia, 230.

 

Pachymius, Egyptian bishop and martyr, 334.

Pæsis, a martyr, 345.

Pagæ, in Lycia, 345.

Palestine, 92, 93, 185, 226, 240, 241, 244, 254, 267, 271, 277, 280, 291, 302, 303, 320, 328, 343, 344, 347, 348, 350, 355; martyrs of, 342–356.

Palmas, bishop of Amastris, 201, 242.

Pamphilus, presbyter of Cæsarea, 320, 334; Eusebius’ Life of, 277; library of, in Cæsarea, 277, 278; tortured, 348; martyrdom of, 351–354.

Pamphylia, 310.

Paneas. See Cæsarea Philippi.

Panegyric of Eusebius on the building of the churches, 370–378.

Panius Mountain, source of the Jordan, 304.

Pantænus, the Philosopher, 224, 225, 253, 259, 261, 267.

Paphos, 310.

Papias, of Hierapolis, 116, 165; writings of, 170; quoted, 172–174; not a hearer of the Apostles, 170; hearer of Aristion and the Presbyter John, 171; of limited understanding, 172; a chiliast, 172.

Papirius, a martyr, 242.

Papylus, a martyr, 193.

Paraclete, the, 229; Manes proclaims himself to be the, 317.

Parætonium, 301.

Parthia, 132.

Parthicus, 90.

Paschal Canon, of Hippolytus, 270; of Dionysius, 305; of Anatolius, 319.

Paschal controversy. See Passover.

Passover, work on, by Melito, 205; controversy concerning the, 241–244; agreement in regard to, reached, 244; Clement’s work on, 259, 260.

Patermuthius, a martyr, 355.

Patmos, 310.

Patricius, vicar of the prefects, 383.

Paul, the Apostle, 99, 226, 246, 283, 304, 310; mentions James the Just, 104; persecutor of Christians, 104; appointed an Apostle, 105; called “prophet,” 107, 110, 113; preaches from Jerusalem to Illyricum, 121, 132, 136, 273; sent to Rome as captive, 123; release and second imprisonment, 124; death of, 128, 129, 130, 132; burial place of, 130; with Peter founds churches of Corinth and Rome, 130, 222; fellow-laborers mentioned, 136, 137; mentions Luke’s Gospel, 137, 149, 154, 273; married, 161, 168; rejected by the Severians, 209; rejected by the Elkesites 280; quoted, 352; Epistles of, 134, 152, 168; Epistles of, a part of the N. T. Canon, 155; Epistles to Timothy, 124, 133; not author of Epistle to the Hebrews, 135; writes to Hebrews in his native tongue, 169, 174, 187, 201; author of Epistle to the Hebrews according to the ancients, 273; “Acts of,” 135; “Acts of,” placed among the Antilegomena, 156.

Paul, an Antiochian heretic, 250.

Paul, a martyr of Cæsarea, 349.

Paul, companion of Dionysius of Alexandria, 282, 301.

Paul of Jamna, a martyr, 352.

Paul of Samosata, 246; character of, 315, 316; heresy of, 312–316, 318; refuted by Malchion, 313; excommunicated, 313; Epistle of the bishops against, 313–315; Synod held against, 320.

Paulinus of Iconium, 268.

Paulinus of Tyre, 369; the tenth book of the Church History inscribed to, 369; Eusebius’ panegyric addressed to, 370; builder of the great church of Tyre, 370 sq.

Peace after the great persecution, 369 sq.; finally assured to the Christians after the defeat of Licinius, 387.

Peleus, Egyptian bishop and martyr, 334, 355.

Pella, a town in Perea, 138, 177.

Penance, rules for, in the early Church, 278.

Pentapolis, 295, 311.

Pepuza, in Phrygia, named Jerusalem by Montanus, 235, 236.

Perea, 122 b.

Perennius, a Roman judge, 239, 240.

Perga, in Pamphylia, 310.

Pergamos, 192, 213.

Persecution under Trajan, 165; under Severus, 249, 251; under Maximinus, 274; under Decius, 280–286; followed by peace, 294; under Valerian, 298–302; under Diocletian, 316, 317, 322, 323–356; under Licinius, 384–386; causes of persecution under Diocletian, discussed, 397–400.

Persia, 317.

Persians, 224.

Pertinax becomes emperor, 245.

Pestilence in Alexandria, 306, 307.

Peter, the Apostle, 99, 104, 226, 258, 261, 304, 310, 311; detects Simon Magus, 105, 115; instructs Cornelius, 107; imprisoned, 111; preaches in Rome, 115, 116; authorizes Mark’s Gospel, 116, 261, 273; meets Philo in Rome, 117; death of, 128, 129, 130, 162; burial-place of, 130, 162; with Paul, founds churches of Rome and Corinth, 130, 222; preaches in Pontus, etc., 132, 136; married, 162; martyrdom of wife of, 162, 165, 168; writings of, 133, 134, 149; First Epistle of, 116, 122, 133, 173, 222, 273; First Epistle of, a part of the N. T. Canon, 156; Second Epistle of, 133, 273; “Acts of,” 133; “Apocalypse of,” 134, 261; Apocalypse of, placed among the νδθοι, 156; “Gospel of,” 133, 258; Gospel of, excluded from the Canon, 157; “Preaching of,” 133; “Teaching of,” 168 (note 15), 171, 172, 173, 174.

Peter, bishop of Alexandria, 322, 334, 360.

Peter, companion of Dionysius of Alexandria, 282, 301.

Peter, a member of Diocletian's household, 327.

Peter Apselamus, a martyr, 351.

Petra, 97.

Peucetius, a favorite of Maximin, 368.

Pharno, mines of, 334, 348.

Pharaoh, 363.

Pharisee, 89, 199.

Philadelphia, 168, 192.

Phileas, bishop of Thmuis, Epistle of, quoted, 330; martyrdom of, 330, 334.

Philemon, a Roman presbyter addressed by Dionysius of Alexandria, 295.

Philetus, bishop of Antioch, 269, 271.

Philip, the Tetrarch, 96, 107.

Philip, the Asiarch, 190.

Philip, bishop of Jerusalem, 176.

Philip of Gortyna, 198, 201; writes against Marcion, 203.

Philip of Arabia, Roman emperor, reported to have been a Christian and to have done penance, 278; Origen’s Epistle to, 279; slain, 280.

Philip, son of Emperor Philip, 278.

Philip, one of the Twelve, 242; preaches in Samaria, 104; encounters Simon Magus, 105; instructs Ethiopian eunuch, 105; married, 161; confounded with Philip, the Evangelist, 162, 171; burial-place of, 162; daughters of, 162, 169, 172, 234, 242.

Philip, the Evangelist, confounded with Philip, the Apostle, 162, 171; death of, and of his daughters, 163, 242; resided at Hierapolis, 172, 242.

Philippians, 168; Polycarp’s Epistle to, 188.

Philo, of Alexandria, family and culture of, 107; embassy to Rome, 108; on the Embassy, 109; on the Virtues, 109; meets Peter in Rome, 117; describes the Therapeutæ, 117–119; De Vita Contemplativa, 117; writings of, 119–121; reads his “On the Virtues” before Roman Senate, 121; referred to by Clement of Alexandria, 260; by Anatolius, 319.

Philomelium, letter to church of, 188.

Philoromus, a martyr in the persecution under Diocletian, 330.

Philosophical mode of life, in sense of asceticism, 117, 169, 252, 256.

Philosophy, used in sense of asceticism. See the preceding.

Philumene, virgin and companion of Apelles, 227.

Phœnicia, 104, 328, 359, 360, 370; martyrs in, 333, 345.

Phœnicians, 304.

Phrygia, 212, 218, 219, 229, 230, 231, 235; burning of an entire city of, during Diocletian’s persecution, 331, 332.

Phrygian heresy. See Montanism.

Pierius, presbyter of Alexandria, 321, 322.

Pilate, procuratorship of, 96; condemns Christ, 98; reports to Tiberius, 105; tyranny of, 109; stirs up tumult among the Jews, 109, 110; suicide of, 110 (note 1); forged acts of, 96, 359, 360; Christ crucified under, 222.

Pinnas, bishop, addressed by the Emperor Gallienus, 302.

Pinytus, bishop of Crete, 197, 201.

Pionius, a martyr, 162.

Pius, bishop of Rome, 182, 183, 221, 243.

Pius, emperor of Rome. See Antoninus Pius.

Plato, 181, 266.

Plinius Secundus, governor of Bithynia, writes concerning Christians, 164.

Plutarch, pupil of Origen, 251; martyrdom of, 252.

Polybius, bishop of Tralles, 168.

Polycarp, bishop of Smyrna, 161, 165, 167, 168, 170, 187, 188, 220, 238, 239, 242, 243; martyrdom of, 188–192; communes with Anicetus and administers the eucharist in Rome, 244.

Polycrates, bishop of Ephesus, quoted, 162, 240; on the Paschal controversy, 242.

Pompey, the Roman general, 90, 92.

Pontianus, bishop of Rome, 271, 274.

Ponticus, a Gallic witness in the persecution under Marcus Aurelius, 216.

Pontius, addressed by Serapion, 237, 258.

Pontius Pilate. See Pilate.

Pontus, 132, 136, 183, 184, 188, 201, 223, 242, 276, 294, 303, 312, 321, 333, 345, 386.

Porphyry, a martyr, 353; his death reported to Pamphilus by Seleucus, 353.

Porphyry, the Neo-Platonist, 264; gives account of Origen, 265; writes against the Christians, 265, 266.

Potamiaena, martyrdom of, 253.

Pothinus, bishop of Lyons, a Gallic witness in the persecution under Marcus Aurelius, 214, 220.

Potitus, a Marcionite, 228.

Pre-existence of Christ, discussed by Eusebius, 82, 85.

Preparation, day of, 346, 347 (note 8).

Presbyter, nature of office of, in the early church, 150 (note 14); ancient, 261; office mentioned, 223, 243, 286, 287, 290, 301, 305, 313, 320.

πρεσβύτεροδ, used in an unofficial sense, 278 (note 5).

Primus, bishop of Alexandria, 174, 175.

Prisca, wife of Diocletian, friendliness of, toward Christians, 323 (note 2).

Priscilla, 121.

Priscilla, Montanist prophetess, 229, 231 (note 18), 235, 237.

Priscus, father of Justin, 185.

Priscus, martyr at Cæsarea under Valerian, 302.

Probus, Roman emperor, 316.

Probus, a martyr, 351.

Proclus, opponent of Caius, 163.

Proclus, an ecclesiastic, 313.

Proclus, a Montanist, and an opponent of Caius of Rome, 130, 163, 268.

Procopius, a Palestinian martyr, 342.

Prophets, from Jerusalem, 107.

Proselyte, Jewish, 93.

Protoctetus, a presbyter of Cæsarea, 274.

Protogenes, 313.

Proverbs of Solomon, called “All-virtuous Wisdom,” 200.

Psalms, celebrating Christ as God, 247; Hexapla of the, 263.

Ptolemæus, a martyr, 195.

Ptolemais, in Pentapolis, 244, 295.

Ptolemies of Egypt, close of dynasty of, 88.

Ptolemy, martyr under Decius, 285.

Ptolemy Lagus, king of Egypt, 223.

Ptolemy Philadelphus, 319.

Publius, bishop of Athens, 200.

Publius, Gentile bishop of Jerusalem, 226.

Pyrucheium, siege of, 318.

Pythagoreans, one of the most famous referred to, 266.

 

Quadratus, the Apologist, 175.

Quadratus, bishop of Athens, 200.

Quadratus, the prophet, 169, 234.

Quinta, martyr under Decius, 283.

Quintus, a Phrygian, 189.

 

Rechabites, 126.

Regeneration, 376.

Remission of sins, according to the Elkesites, 280.

Repentance, Dionysius of Alexandria on, 291, 292.

Resurrection, 376.

Retecius of Autun, 381.

Revelation. See Apocalypse of John.

Rhodo of Asia, writes against Marcion, 227; quoted, 227, 228.

Rhone, river, 211.

Rhossus, in Syria, 258.

Roman church, 225, 242, 271, 286, 290, 312, 317.

Roman emperors, table of, 401.

Roman empire, 89, 90, 101, 223.

Roman learning, 276.

Romans, Epistle to, integrity of, 135, 203, 205; relation of the last chapter to the remainder of the epistle, 388.

Romanus, a martyr, 343.

Rome, 106, 167, 168, 169, 183, 186, 197, 198, 210, 219, 220, 228, 239, 241, 243, 246, 261, 262, 381, 382; Peter and Simon Magus in, 115; gathering place of heretics, 115 (note 6); origin of church of, 115 (note 1); church of, founded by Peter and Paul, 130, 222; Linus, first bishop of, 133; church of, disputes epistle to the Hebrews, 135; liberality of church of, 201; list of early bishops of, 174 (note 1), 175; bishops of, during reign of Antoninus Pius, 182; Irenæus’ catalogue of bishops of, 221; table of bishops of, during the first three centuries, 401.

Romulus, a martyr, 345.

Rufus, governor of Judea, 168, 177.

Ruth, the Moabitess, 93.

 

Sabbath, Dionysius on the, 307.

Sabellius, heresy of, 295; epistles of Dionysius against, 311.

Sabinus, prefect of Egypt under Decius, 282, 301.

Sabinus, an imperial official under Maximin, epistle of, to the provincial governors in regard to the Christians, 357, 358, 364.

Sadducees, most cruel of all the Jews, 127; Jewish sect, 199.

Sadduchus, a Pharisee, 89.

Sagaris, martyrdom of, 205, 242.

Salome, sister of Herod the Great, 95.

Samaria, 104.

Samaritans, Jewish sect, 199.

Samosata, 246, 312–316.

Samuel, 352.

Sanctus, one of the Gallic witnesses in the persecution under Marcus Aurelius, 213, 214, 215.

Saracens, enslave fugitive Christians, 285.

Sardis, 186, 203, 242.

Sarmatians, 219.

Saturnilians, 199.

Saturninus, the Gnostic, 178, 208; asceticism of, 114 (note 18).

Saul, king of Israel, 90.

Scriptures, Irenæus’ account of, 222; allegorical interpretation of, 266 (note 1).

Scythia, 132.

Seal, (σφραγις). See Baptism.

Sects, the seven, among the Jews, 199.

Seleucus, a martyr, 353.

Senate, the Roman, 105.

Seneca, bishop of Jerusalem, 176.

Septuagint, composition of, 223, 319; Origen’s study of, 262; edited by Origen, 263.

Serapion, bishop of Antioch, writings of, 257; writes against Montanists, 237, 240, 257, 258.

Serapion, martyr under Decius, 283.

Serapion, an aged believer of Alexandria, 290.

Serennius Granianus, proconsul of Asia, 181, 182.

Serenus, pupil of Origen, suffers martyrdom by fire, 252.

Serenus, another pupil of Origen, is beheaded, 252.

Servilius Paulus, proconsul of Asia, 205.

Seven, the, appointment of, 103, 104; not deacons, but elders, 103 (note 2a), 163.

Seventy, the, 97, 98, 100, 101, 103, 104, 152.

Severa, wife of Emperor Philip, Origen’s epistle to, 279.

Severians. See Severus.

Severus, a heretic, 209.

Severus, Roman emperor, 245, 247, 249, 254, 255, 263.

Sextus, an ecclesiastical writer, 245.

Shepherd of Hermas. See Hermas.

Sicily, 356, 364, 382.

Sidon, 333.

Sidonius, a Roman confessor, 287.

Silas, companion of Paul, 234.

Silvanus, bishop of Emesa, 333, 360.

Silvanus, bishop of Gaza, 334, 348, 355.

Simeon, bishop of Jerusalem, 146, 149, 176, 199; martyrdom of, 163, 164; date of martyrdom of, 164, 165.

Simon, the high priest, 97.

Simon Barjona, 310.

Simon Magus, attracted by Philip, 104; reputation of, 105; the “great power of God,” 105; pretends conversion, 105; baptism of, 105; detected and rebuked by Peter, 105, 113; denounced in Justin’s Apology, 114; honored with statue in Rome, 114, 115; author of all heresy, 114; meets Peter at Rome, 115; destroyed, 116, 158, 178, 199.

Simonians, immorality of, 114, 199.

Sion, Mount, 352.

Sixtus. See Xystus.

Smyrna, 165, 167, 168, 187, 188, 192; letter of church of, to the church of Philomelium, 188 sq.

Socrates, the philosopher, quoted, 194.

Socrates, bishop of Laodicea, 318.

Sodom, 83.

Solomon, 91, 94, 370; “Wisdom of,” 223, 244, 260.

Song of Songs, commentary on, by Origen, 277.

Sophists, 313.

Sosthenes, a companion of Paul, 99.

Sotas, bishop of Anchialus, 237.

Soter, bishop of Rome, 197, 190, 201, 210, 211, 221, 243.

Spain, 356.

Statius Quadratus, proconsul of Asia, 189 (note 9).

Statue, erected by the woman with an issue of blood, 304.

Stephen, one of the Seven, 104, 161, 218; martyrdom of, 104, 107, 138.

Stephen, bishop of Laodicea, 320.

Stephen, bishop of Rome, on the re-baptism of the lapsed, 293, 294, 295.

Stocks, the, 193, 214, 281, 331, 343, 344.

Stoics, some famous ones referred to, 266.

Strato’s Tower, 111.

Stromata. See Clement of Alexandria.

Sub-deacons, 288.

Subintroductæ, 315.

Suicide of women, to escape defilement, 332, 337; opinions of the Fathers in regard to, 333 (note 3).

Susannah, story of, fictitious, according to Africanus, 276.

Symeon. See Simeon.

Symmachus, translator of the Old Testament, 262, 263, 264; an Ebionite, 264.

Synada, in Phrygia, 268; synod of, 269.

Syneros, a Marcionite, 228.

Synod, at Rome, in behalf of the unity of the Church on occasion of the Donatist schism, 380, 381; at Arles, summoned by Constantine, 381, 382.

Syracuse, 381.

Syria, 88, 89, 167, 168, 178, 185, 294, 302, 318, 328, 355.

 

Taposiris, near Alexandria, 282.

Tarsus, 291, 294, 312, 314.

Tatian, asceticism of, 114 (note 18); authority for martyrdom of Justin, 194; life and writings of, 207–209; heresy of, 207–209: his Book of Problems, 228, 229; instructor of Rhodo at Rome, 222, 228; speaks of Christ as God, 247; mentioned by Clement of Alexandria, 260.

Teaching of Peter. See Peter.

Telesphorus, bishop of Rome, 177, 182, 221, 242.

Telesphorus, addressed by Dionysius, 311.

Temptations, work on, by Dionysius, 311.

Tertullian, family and culture of, 106; apology for Christians, 105; on Nero, 129; quoted, 149, 165; narrates the story of the Thundering Legion, 220.

Tetrapla, of Origen, 263.

Thaddeus, one of the “Seventy,” 99; in Edessa, 100–102, 104.

Thaumaturgus. See Gregory Thaumaturgus.

Thebais, 249, 328, 329, 334, 349, 350.

Thebuthis, a heretic, 199.

Thecla, a martyr, 344, 347.

Thelymidres, bishop of Laodicea, 291, 294.

Themisto, a Montanist, 233, 235.

Theoctistus, bishop of Cæsarea in Palestine, 268, 274, 291, 294, 303.

Theodolus, a martyr, 353.

Theodorus. See Gregory Thaumaturgus.

Theodorus, of Synada, 268.

Theodorus, an ecclesiastic, 313.

Theodorus, Egyptian bishop and martyr, 334.

Theodosia, a martyr, 348.

Theodotion, translator of the Old Testament, 262, 263.

Theodotus of Ephesus, 223.

Theodotus, bishop of Laodicea, 320.

Theodotus, a Montanist, 218, 232.

Theodotus, the elder, the cobbler, 247, 248.

Theodotus, the younger, the banker, 247.

θεολογία. See Divinity of Christ.

Theonas, bishop of Alexandria, 321.

Theophanies, to be regarded as appearances of Christ, 83.

Theophilus, bishop of Antioch, 197, 202.

Theophilus, bishop of Cæsarea, 240, 241, 244, 313.

Theophilus, martyr under Decius, 285.

Theophrastus, admired by the Theodotians, 248.

Theotecnus, bishop of Cæsarea, 303, 312, 313, 320.

Theotecnus, curator of Antioch, 358; death of, 368.

Theraputæ, described by Philo, 117–119.

Thessalonians, 206.

Theudas, the Impostor, 112, 113.

Thomas, the apostle, 100, 101; sends Thaddeus to Edessa, 104; labors in Parthia, 132; Gospel of, excluded from the canon, 156, 171.

Thrace, 237.

Thraseas, bishop and martyr of Eumenia, 236, 242.

“Thundering Legion,” story of, 220.

Thyestean banquets, 213.

Tiberias, 145.

Tiberius, emperor of Rome, 96; reception of Pilate’s report, 105, 106; favors Christianity, 106; death of, 107.

Timæus, bishop of Antioch, 317.

Timolaus, a martyr, 345.

Timotheus, a martyr, 344.

Timothy, Paul’s Epistles to, 124, 133, 137, 221; first bishop of Ephesus, 136.

Timothy, companion of Dionysius of Alexandria, 282, 311.

Titus, first bishop of Crete, 136.

Titus, son of Vespian, conducts war against Jews, 138, 146; becomes emperor, 147.

Tobias, bishop of Jerusalem, 176.

Tobias of Edessa, 101.

Tobias, the father of the former, 101.

Trajan, Roman emperor, 149, 150, 164, 173, 175, 220; forbids Christians to be sought after, 164–166.

Tralles, 168.

Tripolis, 345.

Troas, 168.

“True Discourse,” Origen’s work against Celsus, 278.

Trypho, the Jew, Dialogue of Justin against, 196, 197.

Twelve (apostles), the 99; scattered abroad, 104.

Twelve Prophets, the, commentary on, by Origen, 279.

Tymium in Phrygia, named Jerusalem by Montanus, 235.

Tyrannion, bishop of Tyre, 333.

Tyrannus, bishop of Antioch, 317.

Tyre, 294, 317, 328, 348, 360; the great church of, 370 sq.; description of the church, 375–378; Eusebius’ panegyric on the building of the churches delivered at, 370 sq.

 

Ulpianus, a martyr, 347.

Urbanus, bishop of Rome, 269, 271.

Urbanus, a Roman confessor, 287.

Urbanus, governor of Palestine, 344, 345, 346, 348, 349.

Urbicius, a Roman governor, 195, 196.

Ursus, finance mister of Africa, 382.

 

Valens, Gentile bishop of Jerusalem, 226.

Valentina, a martyr of Cæsarea, 349.

Valentinians, 199.

Valentinus, the Gnostic, 182, 183, 187, 208, 210, 238, 264.

Valeria, daughter of Diocletian, friendliness of, toward Christians, 323 (note 3).

Valerian, Roman emperor, at first friendly to Christians, 298; persecution under, 298–302, 326.

Valerius Gratus, procurator of Judea, 97.

Vales, deacon from Ælia, and martyr, 352.

Vatican, 130.

Verissimus (Marcus Aurelius), 185.

Verus, Roman emperor. See Marcus Aurelius.

Vespasian, emperor, 110, 138, 220; besieges the Jews, 127, 131 (note 4), 141, 143; commands to seek descendants of David, 146, 147.

Vettius Epagathus, one of the Gallic witnesses, 212.

Victor, bishop of Rome, letter of Polycrates to, 162; excommunicates church of Asia, 240, 241, 242, 244, 246, 247; admonished by Irenæus and others for his treatment of the Asiatic church, 243.

Vienne, a city of Gaul, 98; account of martyrs of, 211; Epistle of church of, 212.

Volusian, 298 (note 1).

 

“Wisdom of Solomon.” See Solomon.

Witnesses. See μδρτνς.

 

Xerxes, 145.

Xystus I., bishop of Rome, 176, 221, 243.

Xystus II., bishop of Rome, 294, 297, 303, 312; receives Epistle on Baptism from Dionysius, 295.

 

Zacchæus, bishop of Jerusalem, 176.

Zacchæus, a martyr, 343.

Zacharias, 212, 213.

Zambdas, bishop of Jerusalem, 321.

Zebedee, father of James and John, 309.

Zebinas, a martyr, 350.

Zeno, martyr under Decius, 285.

Zenobius, presbyter of Sidon, 333.

Zenobius, physician and martyr, 334.

Zephyrinus, bishop of Rome, 130, 246, 247, 248, 261, 268.

Zerubabel, 371, 374.

Zeus. See Jupiter.

Zion, mount of, 378.

Zosimus, 168.

Zoticus, bishop of Comana, 233, 236.

Zoticus, of Otrous, 230.


Next: Eusebius: Constantine

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