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Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers, Vol. II:
City of God: Chapter 23

Early Church Fathers  Index     

Chapter 23.—Concerning Felicity, Whom the Romans, Who Venerate Many Gods, for a Long Time Did Not Worship with Divine Honor, Though She Alone Would Have Sufficed Instead of All.

But how does it happen, if their books and rituals are true, and Felicity is a goddess, that she herself is not appointed as the only one to be worshipped, since she could confer all things, and all at once make men happy?  For who wishes anything for any other reason than that he may become happy?  Why was it left to Lucullus to dedicate a temple to so great a goddess at so late a date, and after so p. 76 many Roman rulers?  Why did Romulus himself, ambitious as he was of founding a fortunate city, not erect a temple to this goddess before all others?  Why did he supplicate the other gods for anything, since he would have lacked nothing had she been with him?  For even he himself would neither have been first a king, then afterwards, as they think, a god, if this goddess had not been propitious to him.  Why, therefore, did he appoint as gods for the Romans, Janus, Jove, Mars, Picus, Faunus, Tibernus, Hercules, and others, if there were more of them?  Why did Titus Tatius add Saturn, Ops, Sun, Moon, Vulcan, Light, and whatever others he added, among whom was even the goddess Cloacina, while Felicity was neglected?  Why did Numa appoint so many gods and so many goddesses without this one?  Was it perhaps because he could not see her among so great a crowd?  Certainly king Hostilius would not have introduced the new gods Fear and Dread to be propitiated, if he could have known or might have worshipped this goddess.  For, in presence of Felicity, Fear and Dread would have disappeared,—I do not say propitiated, but put to flight.  Next, I ask, how is it that the Roman empire had already immensely increased before any one worshipped Felicity?  Was the empire, therefore, more great than happy?  For how could true felicity be there, where there was not true piety?  For piety is the genuine worship of the true God, and not the worship of as many demons as there are false gods.  Yet even afterwards, when Felicity had already been taken into the number of the gods, the great infelicity of the civil wars ensued.  Was Felicity perhaps justly indignant, both because she was invited so late, and was invited not to honor, but rather to reproach, because along with her were worshipped Priapus, and Cloacina, and Fear and Dread, and Ague, and others which were not gods to be worshipped, but the crimes of the worshippers?  Last of all, if it seemed good to worship so great a goddess along with a most unworthy crowd, why at least was she not worshipped in a more honorable way than the rest?  For is it not intolerable that Felicity is placed neither among the gods Consentes176 whom they allege to be admitted into the council of Jupiter, nor among the gods whom they term Select?  Some temple might be made for her which might be pre-eminent, both in loftiness of site and dignity of style.  Why, indeed, not something better than is made for Jupiter himself?  For who gave the kingdom even to Jupiter but Felicity?  I am supposing that when he reigned he was happy.  Felicity, however, is certainly more valuable than a kingdom.  For no one doubts that a man might easily be found who may fear to be made a king; but no one is found who is unwilling to be happy.  Therefore, if it is thought they can be consulted by augury, or in any other way, the gods themselves should be consulted about this thing, whether they may wish to give place to Felicity.  If, perchance, the place should already be occupied by the temples and altars of others, where a greater and more lofty temple might be built to Felicity, even Jupiter himself might give way, so that Felicity might rather obtain the very pinnacle of the Capitoline hill.  For there is not any one who would resist Felicity, except, which is impossible, one who might wish to be unhappy.  Certainly, if he should be consulted, Jupiter would in no case do what those three gods, Mars, Terminus, and Juventas, did, who positively refused to give place to their superior and king.  For, as their books record, when king Tarquin wished to construct the Capitol, and perceived that the place which seemed to him to be the most worthy and suitable was preoccupied by other gods, not daring to do anything contrary to their pleasure, and believing that they would willingly give place to a god who was so great, and was their own master, because there were many of them there when the Capitol was founded, he inquired by augury whether they chose to give place to Jupiter, and they were all willing to remove thence except those whom I have named, Mars, Terminus, and Juventas; and therefore the Capitol was built in such a way that these three also might be within it, yet with such obscure signs that even the most learned men could scarcely know this.  Surely, then, Jupiter himself would by no means despise Felicity, as he was himself despised by Terminus, Mars, and Juventas.  But even they themselves who had not given place to Jupiter, would certainly give place to Felicity, who had made Jupiter king over them.  Or if they should not give place, they would act thus not out of contempt of her, but because they chose rather to be obscure in the house of Felicity, than to be eminent without her in their own places.

Thus the goddess Felicity being established in the largest and loftiest place, the citizens should learn whence the furtherance of every good desire should be sought.  And so, by the persuasion of nature herself, the superfluous multitude of other gods being abandoned, Felicity alone would be worshipped, prayer would be made to her alone, her temple alone would be frequented by the citizens p. 77 who wished to be happy, which no one of them would not wish; and thus felicity, who was sought for from all the gods, would be sought for only from her own self.  For who wishes to receive from any god anything else than felicity, or what he supposes to tend to felicity?  Wherefore, if Felicity has it in her power to be with what man she pleases (and she has it if she is a goddess), what folly is it, after all, to seek from any other god her whom you can obtain by request from her own self!  Therefore they ought to honor this goddess above other gods, even by dignity of place.  For, as we read in their own authors, the ancient Romans paid greater honors to I know not what Summanus, to whom they attributed nocturnal thunderbolts, than to Jupiter, to whom diurnal thunderbolts were held to pertain.  But, after a famous and conspicuous temple had been built to Jupiter, owing to the dignity of the building, the multitude resorted to him in so great numbers, that scarce one can be found who remembers even to have read the name of Summanus, which now he cannot once hear named.  But if Felicity is not a goddess, because, as is true, it is a gift of God, that god must be sought who has power to give it, and that hurtful multitude of false gods must be abandoned which the vain multitude of foolish men follows after, making gods to itself of the gifts of God, and offending Himself whose gifts they are by the stubbornness of a proud will.  For he cannot be free from infelicity who worships Felicity as a goddess, and forsakes God, the giver of felicity; just as he cannot be free from hunger who licks a painted loaf of bread, and does not buy it of the man who has a real one.



So called from the consent or harmony of the celestial movements of these gods.

Next: Chapter 24

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